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Odd Words January 28, 2015

Posted by The Typist in books, literature, New Orleans, Odd Words, Poetry, Toulouse Street.
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This coming week in literary New Orleans:

& Thursday at 4:30 pm come meet Judith Fradin, the award-winning author of more than 50 children’s and young adult non-fiction books at Octavia Books. Her most recent book, STOLEN INTO SLAVERY: The True Story of Solomon Northup, Free Black Man won the Carter G. Woodson Award for the best multicultural book of the year..The true story behind the acclaimed movie Twelve Years a Slave, this book is based on the life of Solomon Northup, a free black man from New York who was captured in the United States and sold into slavery in Louisiana. This remarkable story follows Northup through his 12 years of bondage as a man kidnapped into slavery, enduring the hardships of slave life in Louisiana. But the tale also has a remarkable ending. Northup is rescued from his master’s cotton plantation in the deep South by friends in New York. This is a compelling tale that looks into a little known slice of history, sure to rivet young readers and adults alike.

& The East Jefferson Regional Library hosts an Author Event Thursday at 7 pm featuring Rosary O’Neill, New Orleans Carnival Krewes. Carnival krewes are the backbone of the Mardi Gras parades. Every year, different krewes put on extravagant parties and celebrations to commemorate the beginning of the Lenten season. Historic krewes such as Comus, Rex and Zulu that date back generations are intertwined with the greater history of New Orleans itself. Today, new krewes are inaugurated and widen a once exclusive part of New Orleans society. Author and New Orleans native Rosary O’Neill explores this storied institution, its antebellum roots and its effects in the 21st century.

& At 6:30 pm at the EJ Library hosts the East Jefferson Writer’s Group is a critique group for serious fiction writers of all levels who want to improve their story development skills. This group focuses on discussing story development and writing elements and applying critiquing skills in romance, adventure, mystery, literature (but not genres of SciFi, Fantasy, Horror of the alternate Thursday Sci-FI Writers). Short stories, novels, screenplays, plays, comics are accepted; however, non-fiction, such as poetry, biography, autobiography, essays, or magazine articles is not. Free and open to the public. No registration.

& Friday Ann Benoit will be doing a reading from and signing her book New Orleans’ Best Ethnic Restaurants at the Nix Library (1401 S. Carrollton) on at 6:30 PM. Maple Street Book Shop will be on-site as the bookseller for the event. Bounce along this fun-filled culinary tour of New Orleans’ top 100 ethnic restaurants. Romp your way from Eastern European pop-ups to Brazilian churras winding through American ethnic and the Restaurateurs Dilemma, as you travel among lively native stories, unusual suppliers and ingredients, fairs, festivals, scrumptious recipes and easily some of the best food photography produced in the city today. A history, a cookbook and a new culinary atlas for your next trip to the amazing ethic food of fabulous New Orleans or your guidebook to culinary tourism in your own town!

& Friday at 6 pm Bill Lavender, Marc Vincenz, & Willis Gordon present a night of poetry & prose at Crescent City Books. This is the night before the Krewe du vieux parade, folks, so come join us in the French Quarter and come ready to party. Bill Lavender is a poet, novelist, editor and teacher living in New Orleans. He founded Lavender Ink, a small press devoted mainly to poetry, in 1995, and he founded Diálogos, an imprint devoted to cross-cultural literatures (mostly in translation) in 2011. His poems, stories and essays have appeared in dozens of print and web journals and anthologies, with theoretical writings appearing in Contemporary Literature and Poetics Today, among others. Marc Vincenz is British-Swiss, was born in Hong Kong, and has published six collections of poetry. Marc is also the translator of numerous German-language poets, including: Erika Burkart, Ernst Halter, Klaus Merz, Andreas Neeser, Markus Bundi and Alexander Xaver Gwerder. His translation of Alexander Xaver Gwerder’s selected poems, Casting a Spell in Spring, is to be released by Coeur Publishing. Willis Gordon is a Lost Highwayman, an Outlaw Patriot, a Hellraiser, and a writer with no permanent location, going wherever the work takes him. Born and raised in Canton, Ohio, Gordon is an Acclaimed Author, Powerful Essayist, Controversial Columnist, Master Orator, Musician, Boxer, and Veteran of the War on Terror. His work captures the essence of the classic American writers while still maintaining a timelessly fresh and biting quality in his work. As Senior Columnist and Political Columnist he has amassed a brilliant and scorching body of work at Drunken Absurdities.

& Every Friday The Rhyme Syndicate presents a spoken word open mic at Dish on Haynes Boulevard hosted by Hollywood. Doors at 8. Admission $7, $5 will college ID. Music by DJ XXL.

& Friday the FREEDOM WRITING for WOMEN OF COLOR (NEW ORLEANS) group meets at a movable location from 7 pm to 10 p.m. Contact poetryprocess@gmail.com for more information.

& Every Saturday at 2 pm two-time national champions Slam New Orleans (SNO) multi-part workshop for youth and teens will engage participants with poetry both through hearing it and creating their own.. Team SNO is a community-based organization and home of Team SNO. The team, established in 2008, promotes literacy, creativity and self-expression by urging youth and adults alike to become vocal about what matters to them. This The workshops are supported by Poets & Writers, Inc.

& Also at 2 pm Richard Edgar Zwez will sign his new book New Orleans Spirit: A Tchoupitoulas Life at the Main Library on Loyola Avenue. Johnny Smith is left by his mother at his aunt’s home. He becomes part of a quirky family with silly members. He reaches out to his neighborhood and to the citizens of New Orleans. When he does he finds adventures, fun, laughs, and the fiery festivities in the great ethnic mixture of the Big Easy.

& This Sunday at 3 pm The Maple Leaf Reading Series features an Open Mic.

& Susan Larson, the former book editor of the former Times-Picayune newspaper and member of the National Book Critics Circle hosts The Reading Life on WWNO (89.9 FM) on Tuesdays at 1:30 p.m. She features interviews with authors of local and national interest. Watch Odd Words on Facebook and Google+ on Tuesdays for a complete list of her guests and features.

& On Tuesday at 6 pm Octavia Books hosts writer Anya Kamenetz to discuss and sign her new book, THE TEST: Why Our Schools Are Obsessed with Standardized Testing – But You Don’t Have to Be. It’s an exploration of the epidemic of standardized testing that has taken over public schools – and a thorough review of solutions to better assessment and real accountability. THE TEST explores all sides of this problem – where these tests came from, their limitations and flaws, and ultimately what parents, teachers, and concerned citizens can do. It recounts the shocking history and tempestuous politics of testing and borrows strategies from fields as diverse as games, neuroscience, and ancient philosophy to help children cope. It presents the stories of families, teachers, and schools maneuvering within and beyond the existing educational system, playing and winning the testing game. And it offers a glimpse into a future of better tests. With an expert’s depth, a writer’s flair, and a hacker’s creativity, Anya Kamenetz has written an essential book for any parent who has wondered: what do I do about all these tests?

& Jami Attenberg is The 1718’ Society’s February reader at 7PM at the Columns Hotel (3811 St. Charles Avenue). 1718 Society is a literary organization comprised of Tulane, Loyola, and UNO students. They hold monthly readings, which are free and open to the public, the first Tuesday of each month at The Columns Hotel. Maple Street Book shop will be on-site to sell books. Jami Attenberg is the author of the novels The Middlesteins, The Melting Season, The Kept Man and of the story collection Instant Love. She has written for The New York Times, New York, Salon, Nylon, Print, Nerve, and others. Chicago native, she lives in Brooklyn, New York. Her most recent work, Saint Mazie, is forthcoming from Grand Central Publishing in June.

& Tuesday at 6 pm Garden District Book Shops hosts Tom Cooper and his book The Marauders. When the BP oil spill devastates the Gulf coast, those who made a living by shrimping find themselves in dire straits. For the oddballs and lowlifes who inhabit the sleepy, working class bayou town of Jeannette, these desperate circumstances serve as the catalyst that pushes them to enact whatever risky schemes they can dream up to reverse their fortunes. At the center of it all is Gus Lindquist, a pill-addicted, one armed treasure hunter obsessed with finding the lost treasure of pirate Jean Lafitte. His quest brings him into contact with a wide array of memorable characters, ranging from a couple of small time criminal potheads prone to hysterical banter, to the smooth-talking Oil company middleman out to bamboozle his own mother, to some drug smuggling psychopath twins, to a young man estranged from his father since his mother died in Hurricane Katrina. As the story progresses, these characters find themselves on a collision course with each other, and as the tension and action ramp up, it becomes clear that not all of them will survive these events.

& Tuesday at 7 pm the East Jefferson Regional Library hosts an Author Event featuring N.O. Literature, by Nancy Dixon. “N.O. Lit: 200 Years of New Orleans Literature” is a comprehensive collection of the literature of New Orleans. Designed as an introduction for scholars and a pleasure for everyone, this volume will set the standard for years to come. Dixon has gathered some of the most prominent writers long associated with New Orleans, such as Lafcadio Hearn, Tennessee Williams, Truman Capote, and Eudora Welty, as well as more unknown authors such as the writers of Les Cenelles, French Creoles of color who published the first anthology of African American literature in 1845, or Los Isleños, descendents of the 17th-century Spanish immigrants from the Canary Islands. From the first play ever performed in New Orleans in 1809, through Tom Dent’s compelling 1967 drama of violence in the streets, Ritual Murder, this collection traces the city’s history through its authors. Nancy Dixon, PhD, professor of English at Dillard University, has been studying and writing about New Orleans literature, culture, and history for more than 20 years. Her book, Fortune and Misery: Sallie Rhett Roman of New Orleans, (LSU Press 1999), won the Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities “Humanities Book of the Year” award in 2000.

& Every Tuesday night get on the list to spit at the longest running spoken word venue in New Orleans at Sweet Lorraine’s Jazz Club hosted by African-American Shakespear. Doors open at 7pm and the Mic pops at 8pm. It is $5 to get in.

& Wednesday at 5 pm favorite children’s book author Dan Gutman comes to Octavia Books to present and sign GENIUS FILES #5: LICENSE TO THRILL (rescheduled from the preceding week due to the east coast blizzard). The wackiest road trip in history comes to an action-packed conclusion in book five of the New York Times bestselling Genius Files series (we will have books 1-4 on hand as well).

& Wednesday at 6 pm Garden District Book Shops hosts Elisa Segrave and The Girl From Station X. As Anne Segrave approached old age and infirmity, her daughter, Elisa Seagrave was faced with the daunting task of sorting through her mother’s belongings. She was aware of several elements of Anne’s past, but she was astonished to find evidence of an altogether different life when she uncovered a cache of wartime diaries. Now, on the pages before her, Segrave encountered a young woman who put the world of finishing schools and hunt balls behind her to embark on a journey that took her to Bletchley Park, Bomber Command and, eventually, a newly liberated Germany.

& Wednesday at 7 pm in the Woldenberg Art Center, Freeman Auditorium at Tulane University The New Orleans Center for the Gulf South proudly hosts a joint book launch for two New Orleans-based authors who have just published major new works on the region’s recent history. Brian Boyles, author of New Orleans Boom and Blackout: One Hundred Days in America’s Coolest Hotspot, and Benjamin Morris, author of Hattiesburg, Mississippi: A History of the Hub City, will read from their works on Wednesday, February 4 in the Woldenberg Art Center’s Freeman Auditorium. There will be a Q&A session following the lecture and readings. A reception and book signing will follow the event. Boyles, a Tulane graduate from 1999, is currently director of public programming at the Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities. His book chronicles the one hundred days prior to New Orleans’ hosting Super Bowl XLVII in 2013, when business leaders and tourism officials declared the rise of the “new New Orleans,” a thriving city brimming with hope and energy. Yet the watershed moment culminated in darkness when the lights went out in the Superdome. Boyles unearths the conflicts, ambitions, and secret histories that defined the city in this pivotal time. Morris, a poet, writer and member of the Mississippi Artist Roster, received a research fellowship from the Center for his book, the first full-length narrative history of Hattiesburg, a city whose fortunes have long been deeply intertwined with New Orleans . Once a center for lumber and rail, and a “hub city” for the Gulf South, the city is today a regional capital for education, healthcare, commerce, and the armed forces.

& Wednesday at 7 pm the East Jefferson Regional Library hosts Girls Only Author Night, featuring three New Orleans authors talking about their latest books: Test of Faith, by Christa Allan; Rescued by a Kiss, by Colleen Mooney; and Faulkner and Friends, by Vicki Salloum. Guys are welcome. Free of charge and open to the public. No registration

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Crow’ Theology January 25, 2015

Posted by The Typist in poem, Poetry, The Typist, Toulouse Street.
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By Ted Hughes

Crow realized God loved him —

Otherwise, he would have dropped dead.

So that was proved.

Crow reclined, marvelling, on his heart-beat.

And he realized that God spoke Crow —

Just existing was His revelation.

But what

Loved the stones and spoke stone?

They seemed to exist too.

And what spoke that strange silence

After his clamour of caws faded?

And what loved the shot-pellets

That dribbled from those strung up mummifying crows?

What spoke the silence of lead?

Crow realized there were two Gods —

One of them much bigger than the other

Loving his enemies

And having all the weapons.

One Upon A Bayou January 23, 2015

Posted by The Typist in History, New Orleans, NOLA, Poetry, The Narrative, The Typist, Toulouse Street.
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Once upon a bayou an old man and woman came down Esplanade almost daily to the shore. Under the watchful eyes of Gen. P.G.T. Beauregard (C.S.A) the man sat beneath an unravelling straw hat with a cane pole, fishing. The woman in an apron bent and picked dandelion greens in the ancient posture of the plantation. She placed them in an old, plastic ice cream bucket on which the plastic handle had been replaced by a string of twine.

Once upon a time there were such people? There are no lard-fried bream and dandelion green dinners preserved in the freezer aisle at Winn-Dixie. On my way home, turning north at the General’s statue–the direction of his resentful gaze–on the bank a small tractor pulls a spray tank, scarecrow arms extended. Dandelions no longer mar the view of park lawns from the high-rise apartment building on the opposite shore.

Once upon a time there were such people.

Introduction to a longer poem, and a parable for New Orleans. If you chose someday not to publish the poem because of this post, fine. Return to munching leaves or carrion, after your scaly fashion. Your time will come, too.

Odd Words January 21, 2015

Posted by The Typist in Book Stores, book-signing, books, bookstores, History, Indie Book Shops, literature, memoir, New Orleans, novel, Odd Words, Poetry, spoken word, Toulouse Street.
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This coming week in literary New Orleans:

& This Thurday at 7 pm Antenna Gallery: THE WAVES presents the New Orleans launch of the anthology The Queer South (Sibling Rivalry Press, 2014). The dream-child of editor Douglas Ray, The Queer South includes poetry and prose by LGBTQ writers who live in or have strong ties to the South. Our stellar lineup of readers includes Sibling Rivalry Press publishers Bryan Borland and Seth Pennington; Louisiana native and nationally celebrated poet Jericho Brown; and many others, including Ken Pobo, Laurence Ross, Foster Noone, Eddie Outlaw, Ellen Goldstein, D. Gilson, Lydia Roux, and Hannah Riddle. THE WAVES founders, Elizabeth Gross and Brad Richard, will host this multifarious extravaganza of queer talent. Maple Street Book Shop will be on-site as the bookseller for the event. For more information visit: http://thewavesreadingseries.wordpress.com/

& AT 6 pm at the Maple Leaf Book Shop features Arthur Hardy will discuss Mardi Gras in New Orleans: An Illustrated History. Written for the casual Carnival observer as well as the veteran Mardi Gras fan, Mardi Gras in New Orleans: An Illustrated History is a concise and comprehensive pictorial account of the celebration. With 325 vintage and contemporary illustrations and 60,000 words of text, the hardbound volume is the ultimate resource on the celebration, past and present. This updated fourth edition features an expanded reference section that provides details on nearly 600 Carnival organizations, including the identities of 5,000 kings and queens.

& Thursday at 7 pm the East Jefferson Regional Library hosts the SciFi, Fantasy and Horror Writer’s Group. The purpose of the group is to encourage local writers to create works of fiction based on science fiction, fantasy and horror themes. Participants submit manuscripts to be critiqued by others in the group. Open to all levels. Free of charge and open to the public. No registration.

& Every Friday The Rhyme Syndicate presents a spoken word open mic at Dish on Haynes Boulevard hosted by Hollywood. Doors at 8. Admission $7, $5 will college ID. Music by DJ XXL.

& Friday the FREEDOM WRITING for WOMEN OF COLOR (NEW ORLEANS) group meets at a movable location from 7 pm to 10 p.m. Contact poetryprocess@gmail.com for more information.

& Most Saturdays at 11:30 am it is Storytime with Miss Maureen at the Maple Street Book Shop. This week she’ll read Mr. Rabbit and the Lovely Present by Charlotte Zolotow, illustrated by Maurice Sendak. Mr. Rabbit helps a little girl find a lovely present for her mother, who is especially fond of red, yellow, green, and blue.

& Every Saturday at 2 pm two-time national champions Slam New Orleans (SNO) multi-part workshop for youth and teens will engage participants with poetry both through hearing it and creating their own.. Team SNO is a community-based organization and home of Team SNO. The team, established in 2008, promotes literacy, creativity and self-expression by urging youth and adults alike to become vocal about what matters to them. This The workshops are supported by Poets & Writers, Inc.

& Sunday at 1 pm Garden District Book Shop hosts From Newton, Einstein, to GOD, Dr.Leong Ying’s family memoir written uniquely in rhyming poetic verses following his history in six chronological parts from his birth in 1961 up to 2012. The book will have readers laughing at his antics when childhood pranks were his specialty in his birthplace of Singapore, and feeling compassion toward his challenges as the only non-white student in Liverpool (UK) where his family emigrated and his struggles with dyslexia and the language-barriers but excelling in numbers and evolving into his groundbreaking scientific research. But it is his writing and scientific research that takes center stage in Dr. Ying’s life, mostly focusing on his exploration of the Twin Universe theory, which combines science and religion to prove the existence of God and answer many of the formerly unknown answers about the world such as Dark Matter and Dark Energy. He developed the Universal Laws of Thermodynamics to prove God’s existence in 2002. A poetic memoir of amazing skill and proportion, From Newton, Einstein, to GOD explores Dr. Ying’s life and journey to utilize science –which he’d formerly applied to deny God’s existence–to reveal the “ultimate godly secrets.” In doing so, he discovers the Twin Universe, a grand cosmic cycle that will have dramatic influence for evolution and humanity to come.

& Monday at 5 pm the Robert E. Smith Library presents a Writing Workshop. “Do you think in verse that could become poetry? Do you imagine characters, dialogue, and scenes? If so, join the Smith Library’s free Creative Writing Workshop. ”

& This Sunday at 3 pm The Maple Leaf Reading Series features an Open Mic.

& Andy Young will read from All Night It is Morning Monday at 7:30 PM at Tulane’s Freeman auditorium. Reception to follow. Free and open to public. Andy Young’s debut poetry collection cuts across geography, politics, language, and culture. Raised in Appalachia, rooted in New Orleans, and now part of an Egyptian/American family with whom she spent the last two years in Cairo, hers is an American perspective that is refreshingly outward-looking. The poems reflect on living life with a foot in both Arabic and Western cultures but reach beyond the personal to inhabit other realms: from a saucy Cleopatra to a coal miner emerging from a mine collapse, from the ruins of post-Katrina New Orleans to the tumultuous events of the Egyptian revolution. Using the aubade, the traditional form of lovers parting at dawn, to anchor the book, Young examines destruction in the wake of storms, wars and revolution, but also at the ways in which we connect within these disasters. These poems exhibit what Daniel Tobin calls “astonishing formal variety,” embracing the lyric, narrative, fragmentary, as well as traditional forms such as the sonnet.

& Susan Larson, the former book editor of the former Times-Picayune newspaper and member of the National Book Critics Circle hosts The Reading Life on WWNO (89.9 FM) on Tuesdays at 1:30 p.m. She features interviews with authors of local and national interest. Watch Odd Words on Facebook and Google+ on Tuesdays for a complete list of her guests and features.

& Tuesday at 4:30 pm Octavia Books hosts a Middle Grade Children’s Book event: Dan Gutman’s GENIUS FILES. The wackiest road trip in history comes to an action-packed conclusion in book five of the New York Times bestselling Genius Files series. When we last left our heroes, twins Coke and Pepsi McDonald were in Roswell, New Mexico, and they had just seen a strange beam of light. Now their cross-country road trip is about to take a detour that’s out of this world–literally Once the twins get their feet back on the ground, they embark on the final leg of their trip, which will take them from the Hoover Dam all the way to the Golden Gate Bridge. Chased by nefarious villains, the twins will be trapped with a venomous snake, pushed through a deadly turbine, and thrown into a volcano. And craziest of all, their parents might finally believe them.

& Tuesday at 6 pm the People Say Project launch a new book about New Orleans, Brian Boyles New Orleans Boom & Blackout: One Hundred Days in America’s Coolest Hotspot, published 1/12 by The History Press. The book examines a raucous period in the city’s recent history. From consent decrees to cabbie protests, Carville to Carnival, the run up to Super Bowl XLVII saw New Orleans hustle to meet the approaching national spotlight. The event is at Handsome Willy’s. Things kick off at 6pm. Boyles will read from the book, sign copies and maybe even play some music.

& Tuesday at 6 pm Garden District Book Shop hosts Barry Gifford and The Up-Down, a novel of violence, of love, and introspection, The Up-Down follows a man who leaves home and all that’s familiar, finds true love, loses it, and finds it again. Pace’s voyage is outward, among strangers, and inward into the fifth direction that is the up-down, in a sweeping, voracious human tale that takes no prisoners, witnesses extreme brutalities and expresses a childlike amazement. Here the route goes from New Orleans, to Chicago to Wyoming to Bay St. Clement, North Carolina, but the geography he is charting is always first and foremost unchartable.

& Every Tuesday night get on the list to spit at the longest running spoken word venue in New Orleans at Sweet Lorraine’s Jazz Club hosted by African-American Shakespear. Doors open at 7pm and the Mic pops at 8pm. It is $5 to get in.

& Wednesday at 6 pm Maple Street Book Shop will host both Morgan McCall Molthrop & Ronald Drezto read from and sign their respective books, Andrew Jackson’s Playbook: 15 Strategies for Success and The War of 1812.

  • In Andrew Jackson’s Playbook: 15 Strategies for Success, author Morgan McCall Molthrop examines surprising tactics and innovations that have contributed to the city’s rapid recovery, suggesting that contemporary civic leaders have much in common with U.S. Gen. Andrew Jackson who soundly defeated the “invincible” British Army at the Battle of New Orleans 200 years ago.
  • According to author Ronald J. Drez, the British strategy and the successful defense of New Orleans through the leadership of General Andrew Jackson affirm the serious implications of the battle of New Orleans. Far from being simply an unnecessary epilogue to the War of 1812, this climactic-battle firmly secured for the United States the territory acquired through the Louisiana Purchase.

& Wednesday at 7 pm the East Jefferson Regional Library hosts an Author Event: New Orleans Historic Hotels by Paul Oswell. The hotels of New Orleans have welcomed countless visitors in a history stretching back to the eighteenth century. From humble boardinghouse beginnings to the grand hotels of the nineteenth century and through to the modern properties that stand today, hotel life in New Orleans has reflected the city’s own story. From political scandal and celebrity intrigue to events that shaped the landscape of the entire country, the story of New Orleans’s hotels is an endlessly engaging one. Travel writer Paul Oswell checks into the great hotels of the past and the present, telling the story of the properties that stood the test of time, as well as those that didn’t. Using city records, newspaper archives, vintage travel guides and anecdotal stories in the best New Orleans tradition, he brings each one to life and in the process fleshes out the story of the city’s hospitality industry and, by extension, its lively, fascinating history.

Diary of a Hermit Crab Home Worker January 20, 2015

Posted by The Typist in A Fiction, cryptical envelopment, New Orleans, The Narrative, The Typist, Toulouse Street.
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February 26. Covered 172 miles. Cloudy sky, grey sea. Nothingness.

February 27, Covered 94 miles. Blue sky, blue sea. Nothingness.

– Log entries from Bernard Moitessier’s The Long Way

[Loop: Marlboro Theme Song Performed by the Incredible String Band} January 15, 2015

Posted by The Typist in A Fiction, cryptical envelopment, Dancing Bear, New Orleans, The Narrative, The Odd, The Typist, Toulouse Street.
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After a long day, toss all those hours of staring at cryptic test cases written by people with marginal English language skills who are clearly feasting on brownies they are not sharing with you into the back of your pickup, spit on your hands, and crawl behind the wheel with a Frosty 40 of Tree Frog. Peel out, spreading gravel and greenhouse gasses everywhere, Adolph’s mountains spewing spring water in the background while the swine soar on the katabatic drafts and the eagles squeal as the winds flatten their pens. It’s Syd Barrett Time.

Odd Words January 15, 2015

Posted by The Typist in Book Stores, book-signing, books, Indie Book Shops, library, literature, New Orleans, novel, Odd Words, Poetry, Toulouse Street.
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This coming week in literary New Orleans:

The Kenner Branch library will be closed all this week for renovations.

&Thursday at 6 pm Garden District Book Shop hosts Brian Boyles’s and New Orleans Boom and Blackout: One Hundred Days in America’s Coolest Hot Spot. As the 2013 Super Bowl approached, New Orleans rushed to present its best face to the world. Politicians, business leaders and tourism officials declared the rise of the “new New Orleans,” a thriving city brimming with hope and energy. But as the spotlight neared, old conflicts and fresh controversies complicated the branding. The preparations revealed the strains of the post-Katrina recovery and the contrasts of the heralded renaissance. The watershed moment culminated in darkness when the lights went out in the Superdome. In a stunning portrait of the breathless hundred days before the game, author Brian W. Boyles unearths the conflicts, ambitions, and secret histories that defined the city as it prepared for Super Bowl XLVII.

& Also on Thursday at 6 pm Octavia Books hoss a reading and signing with New Orleans author Bill Loehfelm featuring his new book, DOING THE DEVIL’S WORK, A gripping third chapter for one of the most unforgettable and compelling heroines in crime fiction. In honor of Bill, Octavia Books will donate a portion of your purchase of DOING THE DEVIL’S WORK to The Roots of Music. (He refers to them in the book!) Also, a group of drummers will play a few cadences at the start of the evening, so get here! Maureen Coughlin is a bona fide New Orleans cop now, and, with her training days behind her, she likes to think she’s getting the lay of the land. Then a mysterious corpse leads to more questions than answers, and a late-night traffic stop goes very wrong. The fallout leaves Maureen contending with troubled friends, fraying loyalties, cop-hating enemies old and new, and an elusive, spectral, and murderous new nemesis—and all the while navigating the twists and turns of a city and a police department infected with dysfunction and corruption.

& This Thursday also brings All People Open Mic Poetry Circle at 6:30 Mingling, Refreshments (BYOBeverage and food to share if you’d like) and Signing In, 7-9 PM Open Mic Alternating Hosts. No featured readers, No book signings. All People, all the time.

& Thursday at 7 pm the East Jefferson Library hosts a Poetry Event: Peter Cooley Introduces . . . Meena Young. Young is the co-editor of Meena, a bilingual Arabic-English literary journal. She teaches Creative Writing at New Orleans Center for Creative Arts. Her work was recently featured on National Public Radio’s “The World” and published in Best New Poets 2009, Callaloo, Guernica, and Language for a New Century: Contemporary Poetry from the Middle East, Asia & Beyond. Her work has also appeared in electronic music, buses in Santa Fe, flamenco productions, jewelry designs by Jeanine Payer, and a tattoo parlor in Berlin. Cooley also will read from his work. His eight books of poetry, all with Carnegie Mellon University Press, are The Company of Strangers, The Room Where Summer Ends, Nightseasons, The Van Gogh Notebook, The Astonished Hours, Sacred Conversations, A Place Made of Starlight, and, most recently, Divine Margins. The poems featured here are included in the manuscript of his next book, The Night Bus To The Afterlife. Other poems are forthcoming or have recently appeared in Boulevard, Hotel Amerika, Commonweal, American Literary Review and The Literary Review. His most recent book of poetry is titled Night Bus to the Afterlife.

& Thursday at 7 pm the Mid-City Library hosts Ron Chapman discussing his new book The Battle of New Orleans: “But for a Piece of Wood”. His visit coincides with the bicentennial of the Battle of New Orleans.

& This Friday the LA/MS Region for the Society of Children’s Book Writers & Illustrators meets in New Orleans. SCBWI Meeting 1/17 at UNO Bicentennial Educ. Bldg., Founders Road, Room 305Q (across from The Cove). 1:30 Nina Kooij, Editor-in-Chief, Pelican Publishing Co.; 2:30 – 4:30 Critique Meeting. More info at louisianamississippi.scbwi.org

& Every Friday The Rhyme Syndicate presents a spoken word open mic at Dish on Haynes Boulevard hosted by Hollywood. Doors at 8. Admission $7, $5 will college ID. Music by DJ XXL.

& Friday the FREEDOM WRITING for WOMEN OF COLOR (NEW ORLEANS) group meets at Who Dat Coffee Cafe from 7 pm to 10 p.m.

& Every Saturday at 2 pm two-time national champions Slam New Orleans (SNO) multi-part workshop for youth and teens will engage participants with poetry both through hearing it and creating their own.. Team SNO is a community-based organization and home of Team SNO. The team, established in 2008, promotes literacy, creativity and self-expression by urging youth and adults alike to become vocal about what matters to them. This The workshops are supported by Poets & Writers, Inc.

& Saturday at 11:30 am its Storytime with Miss Maureen. This week she’ll read Unicorn Thinks He’s Pretty Great, written and illustrated by Bob Shea. Ever since Unicorn moved into the neighborhood, Goat has been feeling out of sorts. Goat thought his bike was cool-until he saw that Unicorn could fly to school! Goat made marshmallow squares that almost came out right, but Unicorn made it rain cupcakes! Unicorn is such a show-off, how can Goat compete? When Goat and Unicorn share a piece of pizza, Goat learns that being a unicorn might not be all it’s cracked up to be. And when Unicorn shows his admiration for Goat, it looks like the beginning of a beautiful friendship.

& Saturday at 6 pm Octavia Books hosts fun, literature, nursery rhymes, and cocktails when the fabulous Tim Federle whoops it up (and signs) his two hilarious cocktail books. Tequila Mockingbird is the ultimate cocktail book for the literary obsessed. Featuring 65 delicious drink recipes-paired with wry commentary on history’s most beloved novels-the book also includes bar bites, drinking games, and whimsical illustrations throughout. Even if you don’t have a B.A. in English, tonight you’re gonna drink like you do. Drinks include: The Pitcher of Dorian Grey Goose, The Last of the Mojitos, Love in the Time of Kahlúa, Romeo and Julep, A Rum of One’s Own, Are You There, God? It’s Me, Margarita, Vermouth the Bell Tolls, and more! Federle will also sign HICKORY DAIQUIRI DOCK: Cocktails with a Nursery Rhyme Twist. Congratulations, and welcome to parenthood! Babies are a miracle, but even miracles poop. A lot. Thank goodness she’s got your twinkling eyes, he’s got your perfect nose, and we’ve got your aching back. Welcome to “Hickory Daiquiri Dock: Cocktails with a Nursery Rhyme Twist”–the ultimate gift for new parents everywhere. Featuring 20 classic nursery rhymes with a decidedly grown-up twist, it’s time to lose the rattle, pick up a shaker, and throw yourself an extremely quiet party. Especially if you’ve finally gotten the baby to sleep, which is always worth toasting to. Drinks include: Eeny, Martini, Miny, Mo, Jack and Coke (and Jill), Ring Around the Rose, Old MacDonald Had a Flask, Baa, Baa, Black Russian and more.

& This Sunday at 3 pm The Maple Leaf Reading Series features an Open Mic.

& Susan Larson, the former book editor of the former Times-Picayune newspaper and member of the National Book Critics Circle hosts The Reading Life on WWNO (89.9 FM) on Tuesdays at 1:30 p.m. She features interviews with authors of local and national interest. Watch Odd Words on Facebook and Google+ on Tuesdays for a complete list of her guests and features.

& Tuesday at 6 pm Octavia Books features a presentation & signing with Lee A. Farrow celebrating the release of ALEXIS in AMERICA: A Russian Grand Duke’s Tour, 1871-1872. In the autumn of 1871, Alexis Romanov, the fourth son of Tsar Alexander II of Russia, set sail from his homeland for an extended journey through the United States and Canada. A major milestone in U.S.–Russia relations, the tour also served Duke Alexis’s family by helping to extricate him from an unsuitable romantic entanglement with the daughter of a poet. Alexis in America recounts the duke’s progress through the major American cities, detailing his meetings with celebrated figures such as Samuel Morse and Henry Wadsworth Longfellow and describing the national self-reflection that his presence spurred in the American people

& Every Tuesday night get on the list to spit at the longest running spoken word venue in New Orleans at Sweet Lorraine’s Jazz Club hosted by African-American Shakespear. Doors open at 7pm and the Mic pops at 8pm. It is $5 to get in.

& Tuesday at 7 pm The Edith S. Lawson Library in Westwego hosts the Westbank Fiction Writers’ Group. Writing exercises or discussions of points of fiction and/or critique sessions of members’ submissions. Meets the second and fourth Tuesday of every month. Moderator: Gary Bourgeois. Held in the meeting Room.

Wednesday Maple Street Book Shop host a night of poetry and prose with Lavender Ink and Dialogos Books, Wednesday, January 21st, at 6PM! Ralph Adamo, Andy Young, & Jonathan Kline will read.

  • Andy Young’s debut poetry collection, All Night It is Morning ($16) cuts across geography, politics, language, and culture. Raised in Appalachia, rooted in New Orleans, and now part of an Egyptian/American family with whom she spent the last two years in Cairo, hers is an American perspective that is refreshingly outward-looking. The poems reflect on living life with a foot in both Arabic and Western cultures but reach beyond the personal to inhabit other realms: from a saucy Cleopatra to a coal miner emerging from a mine collapse, from the ruins of post-Katrina New Orleans to the tumultuous events of the Egyptian revolution.
  • Ralph Adamo’s Ever ($16) is a collection of poems begun at the turn of the 21st century, composed and revised through the beginning of 2013. In this, his 7th collection, he writes about and through wars, hurricanes, issues as common and profound as work and time, and endurance of every sort. He writes as well as about becoming a father after age 50 and raising two children in a time of transition and conflict. The patterns and forms of these poems vary from tightly controlled couplets through prose poetry and various experimental turns of language. At times painfully lucid, at times opaque, often simultaneously personal and universal, Adamo’s poems seek that most elusive goal: truth as far as language can pursue it, and while truth may remain unfathomable and inexpressible, these poems never waver in their seeking.
  • Jonathan Kline’s The Wisdom of Ashes ($15) is a web of stories connecting two poets, a nun, a black and white dog, and a huge red balloon to a heroin addict, the devil, the dead, and a mousy little man in a woman’s wool overcoat, in New Orleans in the early 1980s. In 44 moments, this novel weaves light and dark, memory and forgetting, madness and war, with the smell of jasmine and the sound of cicadas in a walk along the levee.

& Wednesday at 6 pm Garden District Book Shops features Andra Watkins’s Not Without My Father: One Woman’s 444-Mile Walk of the Natchez Trace. Can an epic adventure succeed without a hero? Andra Watkins needed a wingman to help her become the first living person to walk the historic 444-mile Natchez Trace as the pioneers did. She planned to walk fifteen miles a day. For thirty-four days. After striking out with everyone in her life, she was left with her disinterested eighty-year-old father. And his gas. The sleep apnea machine and self-scratching. Sharing a bathroom with a man whose gut obliterated his aim.
As Watkins trudged America’s forgotten highway, she lost herself in despair and pain. Nothing happened according to plan, and her tenuous connection to her father started to unravel. Through arguments and laughter, tears and fried chicken, they fought to rebuild their relationship before it was too late. In Not Without My Father: One Woman’s 444-Mile Walk of the Natchez Trace, Watkins invites readers to join her dysfunctional family adventure in a humorous and heartbreaking memoir that asks if one can really turn I wish I had into I’m glad I did.

& Wednesday at 7 pm the East Jefferson Regional Library hosts an Author Event: Southern Ladies and Suffragists, by Miki Pfeffer. Women from all over the country came to New Orleans in 1884 for the Woman’s Department of the Cotton Centennial Exposition, that portion of the World’s Fair exhibition devoted to the celebration of women’s affairs and industry. Their conversations and interactions played out as a drama of personalities and sectionalism at a transitional moment in the history of the nation. These women planted seeds at the Exposition that would have otherwise taken decades to drift southward. This book chronicles the successes and setbacks of a lively cast of post-bellum women in the first Woman’s Department at a world’s fair in the Deep South. From a wide range of primary documents, Miki Pfeffer recreates the sounds and sights of 1884 New Orleans after Civil War and Reconstruction. She focuses on how difficult unity was to achieve, even when diverse women professed a common goal. Such celebrities as Julia Ward Howe and Susan B. Anthony brought national debates on women’s issues to the South for the first time, and journalists and ordinary women reacted. At the World’s Industrial and Cotton Centennial Exposition, the Woman’s Department became a petri dish where cultures clashed but where women from across the country exchanged views on propriety, jobs, education, and suffrage. Pfeffer memorializes women’s exhibits of handwork, literary and scientific endeavors, inventions, and professions, but she proposes that the real impact of the six-month long event was a shift in women’s self-conceptions of their public and political lives. For those New Orleans ladies who were ready to seize the opportunity of this uncommon forum, the Woman’s Department offered a future that they had barely imagined.

Googlizing Chaucer January 11, 2015

Posted by The Typist in Odd Words, The Odd, The Typist, Toulouse Street.
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A Googlization:

When the top thrill is with his shores shoot the drop of march have to use it to the roots and bad it everyday in the inspection cool down a with the 2 engine dude is the new were windsor forest with his sweet degrees inspired houston every houghton he’s the tender crap is in the youngest son the house in the damages have a seat on the small follows making melody that sleep with all the night with open ye so cricket him nature is courage is that long getting folk to go on pilgrimage is and the polymers for 2 seconds strangest on the phone all screwed in sundry longs and specially from every cheers end of England to come to Daddy they will and the holy blissful market for to seek for them have opened. One that they were sick just fill that in the season on the day in South look at the tall bottle as I lay ready to wind in on my pilgrimage to Canterbury with full devote caraj at night was comin into that Austin very well nine and twenty in a company year of somebody folk buy a venture follow in fellowship and pilgrims were they all that towards Canterbury woods and ride the tram but as in the stables what it in wide and well aware wedding exit off the Beast and shortly when the Sun was the to rest so how do I spoken with him ever return that I was out of here federal ship on on and made forward early for to rise to take our way there as it all divisor,

Sad Baritone Saturday January 10, 2015

Posted by The Typist in cryptical envelopment, Mardi Gras Indians, New Orleans, The Narrative.
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A sad baritone blowing big round Jello-tremulous Os of the blues.

That’s what started this ramble into a pleasant melancholia  a fizzing afternoon beer buzz of sadness not quite cheerless, simply there like a color in the air a sky so blue and clear you can hear it, a faint hum beneath your feet an afternoon so perfectly empty you just want to lay down in the arms of some big oak and root, thinking:  well, if the world is going to caterwaul in a crashing train wreck, I guess I’m not busy today. Go ahead. I voted early.

And then you remember the Indians, stuffed into the lobby of the museum. So you go and the colors aren’t quite right all that expanse of white marble flattening the joyous chromatic colors into something cartoonish , stealing the scene’s perspective like some VCR on endless loop, alone in a neutral cream room of neatly labeled artifacts under glass instead of the slow approach up a street lined with long, low rows of shotguns and maybe a catercorner store.

First just a spyboy peering around the black chalkboard brightly proclaiming Hot Breakfast and Cold Beer, then a hammering of tambourines in the distance and then you spot them, turning a corner:  bright-beaded bird creatures from a dream, singing in a language they have made themselves.

That’s when you decide:  No, thank you I want to slap the snooze button on that doom clock your time doesn’t apply to us down here we’re on Central River Time and things things are just a bit slower and we’re not quite ready for all your rapturous end time mob of murder and riots. We’re all in pawn up to the brim of our sharp fur felt fedoras so here’s a quarter: call in all your sad Wall Street stories to someone else.

If you’re going to destroy your world try to keep it down to a manageable rumble in the distance, please, perhaps a smudge of smoke on the horizon like a marsh fire and leave us to ourselves to the scat-o-logical chantings of Fi-Yi-Yi to mad tambourine time the bright side of the poverty and sadness you turn into spewing automaton television heads and we turn into a sad baritone sax blowing big round Jello-tremulous Os measuring the girth of the blues just about city sized and right for us, thanks.

The Taste of Carnations January 9, 2015

Posted by The Typist in cryptical envelopment, New Orleans, The Narrative, The Odd, The Typist, Toulouse Street.
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Tonight of all nights I would hear the saddest songs.

This wine of the Alicante,
dark as blood spilt by night,
sharp as flint, a spark
in the sparkle with the savor
of must fresh from dusty feet
walked hard and long buried.

I would taste carnations
fed with the blood of bulls.

Tonight I would hear the saddest songs
because joy is a wind
that blows hot and cold
but sadness outlasts empires.

Odd Words January 7, 2015

Posted by The Typist in books, Indie Book Shops, library, literature, New Orleans, Odd Words, Poetry, Toulouse Street.
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This coming week in literary New Orleans:

& Thursday at 6 pm Octavia Books hosts an evening with acclaimed cartoonist Ben Katchor when he comes to Octavia Books to give a reading with slideshow presentation featuring his latest book, HAND DRYING IN AMERICA And Other Stories. From one of the most original and imaginative American cartoonists at work today comes a collection of graphic narratives on the subjects of urban planning, product design, and architecture—a surrealist handbook for the rebuilding of society in the twenty-first century.

& At Garden District Books Shop at 6 pm Thursday meet Stuart Smith, author of Crude Justice: How I Fought Big Oil and Won, and What You Should Know About the New Environmental Attack on America.One day in the small Mississippi town of Laurel, a 26-year-old expectant mom named Karen Street sat down at the edge of her bathtub—and felt her hip split in two. The episode was so bizarre it wasn’t until later, after she saw the doctor, that she realized her bone disease was almost certainly linked to her father-in-law’s business. Winston Street ran a machine shop that drilled the gunk out of pipes used by Chevron, Shell and other giants of the oil industry—creating a white powder that covered Karen Street’s husband’s overalls every night, which then landed in their vegetable garden…and was highly radioactive. Winston Street didn’t know the dust was poisonous, nor did his workers or his family. But someone did know. Indeed, there was evidence that America’s Big Oil companies were aware for decades that they were pulling up radium from under the earth, poisoning yards like Street’s while dumping radioactive water in unlined pits across the South. Now, to prove that and win justice for his blue-collar clients, an untested young lawyer named Stuart H. Smith and his eccentric team would have to get the better of America’s best-known radiation attorney and the global clout of Chevron inside a Mississippi courtroom.

& At 7 pm Thursday the East Jefferson Regional Library hosts the biweekly SciFi, Fantasy and Horror Writer’s Group. The purpose of the group is to encourage local writers to create works of fiction based on science fiction, fantasy and horror themes. Participants submit manuscripts to be critiqued by others in the group. Open to all levels. Free of charge and open to the public. No registration.

& Every Friday The Rhyme Syndicate presents a spoken word open mic at Dish on Haynes Boulevard hosted by Hollywood. Doors at 8. Admission $7, $5 will college ID. Music by DJ XXL.

& Starting Friday Tubby and Coo’s Mid-City Book Shop will host a raft of readings at Booth 421 at this weekend’s Comic Con, starting with:

  • BILL LOEHFELM signing his new mystery set in New Orleans, DOING THE DEVIL’S WORK, at Tubby and Coo’s Mid-City Book Shop . This is the third book in the Maureen Coughlin series and is an “Indie Next” pick for the month of January. Bill will be signing on Friday, Jan. 9 from 5-6 PM, Saturday, Jan. 10 from 4-5 PM, and Sunday, Jan. 11 from 2-3 PM.
  • ALYS ARDEN will sign THE CASQUETTE GIRLS, a horror/fantasy novel set in New Orleans where a teenage girl releases a hurricane of 18th century myths and monsters on the city. She will be signing on Friday, Jan. 9 from 6-7 PM, Saturday, Jan. 10 from 5-6 PM, and Sunday, Jan. 11 from 12-1 PM. /li>
  • J. L. MULVIHILL signs her new release CROSSINGS, a sequel to THE BOXCAR BABY, part of the Steel Roots series, told in an alternate steampunk dystopian world. She will sign on Saturday, Jan. 10 from 2-3 PM and Sunday, Jan. 11 from 11 AM – 12 PM.
  • DAWN CHARTIER signs her newest release, BEWITCHING THE ENEMY, a paranormal romance featuring witches, evil warlocks, and a hot doctor, set in New Orleans. Dawn will sign on Saturday, Jan. 10 and Sunday, Jan. 11 from 1-2 PM.
  • MOIRA CRONE signs her dystopian, sci-fi, set in New Orleans, novel THE NOT YET, which was a Philip K. Dick Award Finalist in 2012. Moira will sign on Saturday, Jan. 10 from 3-4 PM; and,
  • GREG HERREN signs his newest books, MURDER IN THE ARTS DISTRICT (A Chanse MacLeod Mystery) set in New Orleans, and DARK TIDE, a YA mystery set in Alabama on the Gulf Coast. Greg will sign on Saturday, Jan. 10 from 12-1 PM.

& Friday the FREEDOM WRITING for WOMEN OF COLOR (NEW ORLEANS) group meets at Who Dat Coffee Cafe from 7 pm to 10 p.m.

& Saturday at 11:30 am its Storytime with Miss Maureen. This Saturday she’ll read Shh! We Have a Plan by Chris Haughton. From the creator of Little Owl Lost and Oh No, George! comes a funny, strikingly illustrated story of best-laid plans — and the secret to attracting the birdie. Four friends creep through the woods, and what do they spot? An exquisite bird high in a tree! “Hello birdie,” waves one. “Shh! We have a plan,” hush the others. They stealthily make their advance, nets in the air. Ready one, ready two, ready three, and go! But as one comically foiled plan follows another, it soon becomes clear that their quiet, observant companion, hand outstretched, has a far better idea. Award-winning author-illustrator Chris Haughton is back with another simple, satisfying story whose visual humor plays out in boldly graphic, vibrantly colorful illustrations.

& Saturday at 1 pm the Norman Mayer Library hosts T(w)een Weekend Writing Workshop. No matter what kind of writing you do or even if just think you’d like to, join us 2nd Saturdays in the Teen Room to talk about and share (if you want to) your stories, poetry, scripts, or comics.

& Saturday at 1:30 pm meet the little mouse Santi at Garden District Book Shop. He may be small, but he has a big dream! This beautifully illustrated story explores one of the most important aspects of a child’s life, the search for identity. Santi wants to be a cat, and even though all the other mice laugh at him, he follows his dream. This timeless story ends with a whimsical twist as Santi learns a valuable lesson about self-determination while also learning he is not the only dreamer! David Eugene Ray signs his book, The Little Mouse Santi.

& At 2 pm the Alvar Library hosts Youth Poetry Workshops with SLAM New Orleans. Slam New Orleans (SNO) is a community-based organization and home of Team SNO. The team, established in 2008, promotes literacy, creativity and self-expression by urging youth and adults alike to become vocal about what matters to them. This multi-part workshop for youth and teens will engage participants with poetry both through hearing it and creating their own. The workshops are supported by Poets & Writers, Inc.

& The Dickens Fellowship of New Orleans January meeting will be Saturday from 2-4 pm at Metairie Park Country Day School’s Bright Library. The program is WHAT: JANUARY MEETING at Metairie Park Country Day School’s Bright Library. PROGRAM: Bleak House, Chapters 23-35, book discussion. This represents two sessions worth of reading due to the Christmas party. Meetings are held September through May, reading one of the works of Charles Dickens each year. The meetings include book discussions, movie versions of the novel, and lectures by Dickens scholars. This year’s book is BLEAK HOUSE. Dues are $25/person (couples $40) payable in September.

& At 3 pm POCCAC – Poets of Color and Culture – meets (every other Saturday) at BlackStar Books and Caffe. POCCAC is dedicated to making space for people of color in New Orleans to write together about their common and varied experiences. A more complete mission statement to be formulated collectively as the writing circle grows and evolves.

& This Sunday at 3 pm The Maple Leaf Reading Series features an Open Mic.

& Monday the East New Orleans Regional Library features New Orleans Spoken Word Artists presenting workshops that include poetry writing and performance, with the goal of building community through writing and strengthening students’ written and verbal communication skills.

& At the Robert E. Smith Library at 5 pm hosts a Creative Writing Workshop. Do you think in verse that could become poetry? Do you imagine characters, dialogue, and scenes? If so, join the Smith Library’s free Creative Writing Workshop.

& Susan Larson, the former book editor of the former Times-Picayune newspaper and member of the National Book Critics Circle hosts The Reading Life on WWNO (89.9 FM) on Tuesdays at 1:30 p.m. She features interviews with authors of local and national interest. Watch Odd Words on Facebook and Google+ on Tuesdays for a complete list of her guests and features.

& Tuesday at 6:30 pm brings an Author Night at Hubbell Library: New Orleans Historic Hotels. Author Paul Oswell will discuss his new book on the old hotels of New Orleans.

& At 7 pm Tuesday The Alvar Library’s Alvar Arts presents an Author Reading by Andy Young.

& Every Tuesday night get on the list to spit at the longest running spoken word venue in New Orleans at Sweet Lorraine’s Jazz Club hosted by African-American Shakespear. Doors open at 7pm and the Mic pops at 8pm. It is $5 to get in.

& Tuesday at 7 pm The Edith S. Lawson Library in Westwego hosts the Westbank Fiction Writers’ Group. Writing exercises or discussions of points of fiction and/or critique sessions of members’ submissions. Meets the second and fourth Tuesday of every month. Moderator: Gary Bourgeois. Held in the meeting Room.

& Wednesday at 7 pm the East Jefferson Regional Library hosts an Author Event: Mardi Gras in New Orleans, by Arthur Hardy. Written for the casual Carnival observer as well as the veteran Mardi Gras fan, Mardi Gras in New Orleans: An Illustrated History is a comprehensive pictorial account of the celebration from ancient times in Europe to post-Hurricane Katrina New Orleans. The book contains more than 350 vintage and contemporary illustrations and 60,000 words of text. The volume includes a complete dictionary of terms and Mardi Gras Q & A— answers to the most frequently asked questions. This updated 5th edition features an expanded reference section that provides details on hundreds of Carnival organizations, including the identities of more than 5,000 kings and queens. Hardy is a nationally recognized authority on Mardi Gras in New Orleans. This fifth-generation New Orleanian has been seen on local television in New Orleans since 1987. Since 1977, his award-winning “Mardi Gras Guide” magazine has sold nearly two million copies to subscribers in all 50 states and 27 foreign countries. BYO King Cake.

Odd Words January 1, 2015

Posted by The Typist in authors, book-signing, books, Indie Book Shops, literature, New Orleans, novel, Odd Words, Poetry, Toulouse Street.
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This quiet holiday week in literary New Orleans (Christmas isn’t over until 12th Night, you know, and then: Carnival):

& Every Friday The Rhyme Syndicate presents a spoken word open mic at Dish on Haynes Boulevard hosted by Hollywood. Doors at 8. Admission $7, $5 will college ID. Music by DJ XXL.

& Saturday brings the first Poetry Buffet of 2015: Wringing Out the Old/Ringing in the New to the Latter Memorial Library at 2 pm. Organizer poet Gina Ferrara invites local poets to come read a poem that’s old or that’s new.

& At 3 pm POCCAC – Poets of Color and Culture – meets (every other Saturday) at BlackStar Books and Caffe. POCCAC is dedicated to making space for people of color in New Orleans to write together about their common and varied experiences. A more complete mission statement to be formulated collectively as the writing circle grows and evolves.

& This Sunday at 3 pm The Maple Leaf Reading Series features an Open Mic.

& Susan Larson, the former book editor of the former Times-Picayune newspaper and member of the National Book Critics Circle hosts The Reading Life on WWNO (89.9 FM) on Tuesdays at 1:30 p.m. She features interviews with authors of local and national interest. Watch Odd Words on Facebook and Google+ on Tuesdays for a complete list of her guests and features.

& The First Tuesday Book Club will meet at 5:45PM, Tuesday at Maple Street Book Shop, to discuss Wolf Hall by Hilary Mantel. Newcomers are always welcome!

& At 6 pm Garden District Book Shop features Bill Loehfelm and Doing the Devil’s Work. Bill Loehfelm is a rising star in crime fiction. And his Maureen Coughlin is the perfect protagonist: complicated, strong-willed, sympathetic (except when she’s not), and as fully realized in Loehfelm’s extraordinary portrayal as the New Orleans she patrols. The first two installments in this series won Loehfelm accolades as well as fans, and Doing the Devil’s Work only ups the ante. It’s even faster, sharper, and more thrilling than its predecessors. Taut and fiery, vibrant and gritty, and peopled with unforgettable characters, this is the sinuous, provocative story of a good cop struggling painfully into her own.

& At 7 pm Tuesday the East Jefferson Regional Library hosts an Author Event featuring Andrew Jackson’s Playbook, by Morgan Molthrop. The book centers around Jackson’s strategies in bringing a diverse group of Creoles, free people of color, pirates, Tennessee militiamen, Choctaw Indians and Kaintucks (about 3,000 in total) to defeat a disciplined army of more than 10,000 British troops. “The victory was as important – and miraculous – as the recovery of the city after Katrina,” Molthrop said in a recent interview with BBC Record London. “As we approach the 10th anniversary of Katrina, one can’t help make comparisons between the strategies used by Jackson 200 years ago and those used by contemporary civic and cultural leaders over the past decade.”

& Every Tuesday night get on the list to spit at the longest running spoken word venue in New Orleans at Sweet Lorraine’s Jazz Club hosted by African-American Shakespear. Doors open at 7pm and the Mic pops at 8pm. It is $5 to get in.

& Wednesday at 8 pm at the Allways Esoterotica’s local provocateurs are doing it again: bringing you the absolute best of what was performed our stage from last year at our Sexiest Selections of 2014