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No Services July 30, 2013

Posted by The Typist in cryptical envelopment, New Orleans, The Narrative, The Typist, Toulouse Street.
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Smack dead in the middle of the continent, nodding and dreaming of oceans, ghost signals on the FM and pedal steel soybean reports crackling over the AM. You stare at the highway but don’t let yourself become hypnotized, eyes roam over the instruments, speed 78, gas three-eights, tach and temp steady but not too long. There is a term from aviation that I often encounter at work, task saturation. On the highway starting at the map on your knee or desperately searching the radio and suddenly the lonely overpass stanchion on the next road to no where is coming up on you at 120 feet per second and only the rumble strips save you.

You begin to wonder what lies up those empty roads, numbered exits, no services. Somewhere out there a tree stands alone, older than North Dakota and you wonder what spirits inhabit the rise it has conquered and held against a hundred brutal winter. Take the other turn and find a glacial pond filled with trumpeter swans ballet graceful on their brown stage yet raucous in their calls as a brass band testing their embouchures.

Speed climbs over 80 breasting the next rolling ridge, gas one-quarter (bingo to Bismark), radio useless, the horizon rushing toward you vacant as a corridor of discount malls and over the crackle of Saskatchewan cattle prices a tinny voice in the back of your head urgently deadpans: Eject! Eject! Eject!

The tires hiss in your ears, a distant bit of sand, butt sunk in the damp wash, baby waves rolling in the calm, the kiss of the wave and the gentle hiss of it’s retreat calling you in, the gentle tug like eyes and hands locked backward into the bedroom and in this dangerous 80 mile-per-hour daydream suddenly the undertow is pulling you toward another horizon, the conquistador possibilities of a southern ocean. Loud goose arrows in the sky call to you, pointing south: last star to the right and straight on until dawn

(Yes, this is a report. When the brain goes on vacaction, you can always pull the Art Buchwald is On Vacation repost trick).

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Interrupted by Hummingbirds July 29, 2013

Posted by The Typist in cryptical envelopment, New Orleans, Poetry, The Narrative, The Odd, The Typist, Toulouse Street.
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Compose your life like a prose poem suddenly interrupted by hummingbirds mistaking a woman’s perfume for wildflowers in Arles, a Scorpio moon the only excuse necessary for hallucinatory episodes at Starbucks’ counter, visualizing Cthulu in your latte foam and paralyzing the commerce of graven tablets. When confronted with a Don’t Walk sign, improvise. Sing. Tear up the book in your pocket and stuff a poem into each mail mailbox you pass. This is not chaos. This is the Coriolis force reordering helpless pedestrians into your chorus, storefronts into episodes, sparrows into characters.(Pages of illustrations). Don’t be pigeonholed into a notebook occupying a park bench. Don’t let your day be the litter of butts around an outside table. Don’t spend your nights lonely and mooning over your poetry. This is not how sonnets work. Follow a dark woman with a fistful of violets in your hand. When she confronts you, pass her the flowers, tell her she has mistaken you for a villanelle. Smile. Anything could happen, the moment you have been fomenting all day.

Odd Words July 25, 2013

Posted by The Typist in books, literature, New Orleans, novel, Odd Words, Poetry, publishing, reading, Toulouse Street.
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Lolis Treme BookThis week’s big event is the launch of TREME: Stories and Recipes from the Heart of New Orleans by foodways writer, Treme contributor and writer/co-producer of the film Faubourg Treme: The Untold Story of Black New Orleans. Lolis Eric Elie. He will be at the Crescent City Farmers Market signing his book Saturday.

& Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. the Juju Bag Cafe, 5363 Franklin Ave., presents a Spoken Word Showcase, with happy hour from 5-7 and open mic starting at 7:30 p.m. Check whodatpoets.com for featured performers.

& At 7 p.m. Thursday in the Jefferson Parish East Bank Regional Library, the Great Book Discussion Group meets to discuss Truman Capote’s In Cold Blood.

& Thursday night around 9 p.m. is a poetry meet-up at Fiora’s Coffee Shop and Gallery loosely organized by Jimmy Ross. Mostly we sit around outside in the breeze, visit and occasionally read a poem. Sometimes it happens, and sometimes it doesn’t. If no one shows up, push your coffee cup aside and put that notebook on the table and write!. Come grab a cup of iced tea and join us.

& Thursday at noon the New Orleans Museum of Art Book Club will discuss The $12 Million Stuffed Shark by Don Thompson and Seven Days in the Art World by Sarah Thornton. For more details on the club, contact Sheila Cork at scork@noma.org or (504) 658-4117.

& Every first, second and fourth Friday (that’s this Friday) check out Turnt Up Friday, a spoken word event at the Garage Cafe, 1532 Dumaine St. Doors at 7:30 p.m.

& Join Octavia Books for a special Saturday morning at the Crescent City Farmers Market featuring Lolis Eric Elie signing his much anticipated TREME: Stories and Recipes from the Heart of New Orleans. Inspired by David Simon’s award-winning HBO series Treme, this celebration of the culinary spirit of post-Katrina New Orleans features recipes and tributes from the characters, real and fictional, who highlight the Crescent City’s rich foodways. From chef Janette Desautel’s own Crawfish Ravioli and LaDonna Batiste-Williams’s Smothered Turnip Soup to the city’s finest Sazerac, New Orleans’ cuisine is a mélange of influences from Creole to Vietnamese, at once new and old, genteel and down-home, and, in the words of Toni Bernette, “seasoned with delicious nostalgia.” As visually rich as the series itself, the book includes 100 heritage and contemporary recipes from the city’s heralded restaurants such as Upperline, Bayona, Restaurant August, and Herbsaint, plus original recipes from renowned chefs Eric Ripert, David Chang, and other Treme guest stars.

& Saturday at Maple Street Book Shop Ryan Murphy will be reading and signing What the Sleepy Animals Do at the Audubon Zoo at 11 a.m. No Storytime with Miss Maureen.

& Sunday at 3 p.m. at the Maple Leaf Bar is the Maple Leaf Reading Series, the oldest continuous reading series in the south, founded by Everette Maddox. In the back patio, weather permitting. Periodic features and an open mic every Sunday.

hives and archeology, the author presents fascinating insights on how residents of this working plantation actually lived

& WhoDatPoets.com lists four Spoken Word shows on Sunday nights: The new Sunday show from Spoken Word New Orleans is Poetry and Paint Brushes. Spoken Word artists perform as a resident artist sketches the performers. Doors at 7 pm. and show at 8 pm. at Special Tea, 4337 Banks Street. There are also open mics at The Black Star Cafe, 800 Belleville St. in Algiers at 7 p.m.; The Shadowbox Theater at 2400 St.Claude Ave. at 6 p.m.; Espe’s Kitchen, 1743 N Broad St. at 7 p.m.; and, the T****** Wine Lounge, 3001 Tulane Ave., doors at 9 p.m., Admission $5. For phone numbers with more details on all these readings visit WHODATPOETS.COM. (If I don’t block out the name of the location at 3001 Tulane, Facebook will reject my ad for promoting alcohol. Go figure.)

& Monday night The Fiction Writers Group at the East Jefferson Regional Library will host guest author Anita Paul at 7 p.m. A communications specialist, Paul is known as “The Author’s Midwife.” She coaches and mentors corporate professionals and successful entrepreneurs to become published authors. Through her Write Your Life program, she shares strategies for writing, publishing, and marketing a book … and then leveraging it to upsell your expertise. Paul is the author of three books: Take the Mystery Out of Marketing (2002), What Goes Around Comes Around (a novel), and Write Your Life: Create Your Ideal Life And the Book You’ve Been Wanting to Write.

& Susan Larson, the former book editor of the former Times-Picayune newspaper and member of the National Book Critics Circle hosts The Reading Life on WWNO (89.9 FM) on Tuesdays at 1:30 p.m. She features interviews with authors of local and national interest.

& Tuesday night at 6 p.m. Garden District Book Shop features Stephen Maitland-Lewis’s Ambition. “Having it all will never be enough for George Tazoli, an ambitious dealer on the trading floor of a prominent California bank. He is hand-picked for a special assignment to sell off bad loans, but not because he is dating the daughter of the bank’s president, rather for his skill at working the market. The promotion sends him to New York, putting a strain on his relationship, but then a scandalous discovery lures him into the gamble of a lifetime.”

& Also Tuesday at 6 pm Maple Street Book Shop hosts Scottish author Zoe Venditozzi will be signing her book <emAnywhere’s Better Than Here. Laurie’s life is going nowhere. She lives with a computer game-obsessed boyfriend and has a meaningless job. The highlight of her week has become finding a new snack food at the supermarket. When Laurie meets an older, mysterious man things veer suddenly out of control, and she needs a plan – fast. For anyone who’s ever got stuck with a hopeless partner and a dead end life – this is not the way to go.

& Also on Tuesday the Jefferson Parish Library Writers Group meets at the Westwego library from 7-9 pm.

& Every Tuesday night get on the list to spit at the longest running spoken word venue in New Orleans at Sweet Lorraine’s Jazz Club hosted by African-American Shakespear. This Tuesday you don’t want to miss the New Orleans Slam Team goes head-to-head with Team SNO. Doors open at 7pm and the Mic pops at 8pm. It is $5 to get in.

Wednesday at 6 p.m. Octavia Books hosts a reading and signing with Bennett Sims featuring his recent novel, A QUESTIONABLE SHAPE, a wise and calculated postmodern zombie novel. “A Questionable Shape is a novel for those who read in order to wake up to life, not escape it, for those who themselves like to explore the frontiers of the unsayable. I envision the core readership as brilliant and slightly disaffected men and women… fans of Anne Carson, Nicholson Baker, Rivka Galchen, Juan Rulfo, W.G. Sebald, Henry and William James, and gaggles of Russian and German writers. [A Questionable Shape] is more than just a novel. It is literature. It is life.”-The Millions. Sims was born and raised in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. His fiction has appeared in A Public Space, Tin House, and Zoetrope: All-Story. A graduate of the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, he currently teaches at the University of Iowa, where he is the Provost Postgraduate Visiting Writer in fiction.

Every Wednesday at Buffa’s in the back room there will be music and poetry hosted by Laura Mattingly from 7-8 p.m. followed by an open mic open to all performers: musicians, poets, comics.

Accept me as I am. July 24, 2013

Posted by The Typist in cryptical envelopment, New Orleans, Oddball, The Narrative, The Typist, Toulouse Street.
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Guido in tub

Accept me as I am. Only then can we discover each other.
— Guido in Fellini’s 8½

Odd Words July 18, 2013

Posted by The Typist in books, New Orleans, novel, Odd Words, Poetry, publishing, Radiators, Toulouse Street.
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& Local mystery novelist Kent Westmoreland will be signing his book Baronne Street at the Monteleone Hotel as part of Tales of the Cocktail from 3-3:30 p.m. Thursday and again at 1 p.m. on Saturday. Bombay Sapphire will be mixing character Burleigh Drummond’s favorite Sapphire cocktail.

& Thursday evening at 6 p.m. Octavia Books hosts a reading & signing with author Matthew Guinn featuring his new Southern Gothic style book, THE RESURRECTIONIST, which delves into the dark, surreal legacy of one slave owned by a South Carolina Medical school. It’s a thrilling narrative based on the true story of Grandson Harris, the “Resurrection Man” of Georgia.

& Thursday at 6 p.m. Garden District Book Shop will host Thalia “Tex” Seggelink and Kim Ritchie “Blaze” Spencer and their book The Thinking Moms’ Revolution. The Thinking Moms’ Revolution (TMR) is a group of twenty-three moms (and one awesome dad) from Montana to Malaysia who all have children with developmental disabilities. Initially collaborating online about therapies, biomedical intervention, alternative medicine, special diets, and doctors on the cutting edge of treatment approaches to an array of chronic and developmental disabilities, such as autism, sensory processing disorders, food allergies, ADHD, asthma, and seizures, they’ve come together into something far more substantial. Suspecting that some of the main causes may be overused medicines, vaccinations, environmental toxins, and processed foods, they began a mission to help reverse the effects. In the process, they became a tight-knit family dedicated to helping their kids shed their diagnoses.

& Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. the Juju Bag Cafe, 5363 Franklin Ave., presents a Spoken Word Showcase, with happy hour from 5-7.

& At 7 p.m. Thursday in the Jefferson Parish East Bank Regional Library, the Great Book Discussion Group meets to discuss Truman Capote’s In Cold Blood.

& Thursday night around 9 p.m. is a poetry meet-up at Fiora’s Coffee Shop and Gallery loosely organized by Jimmy Ross. Mostly we sit around outside in the breeze, visit and occasionally read a poem. Come grab a cup of iced tea and join us.

& On Saturday Tonja Koob Marking and Jennifer Snape will be signing their book Huey P. Long Bridge at Maple Street Book Shop at 11 a.m. This is their second Arcadia Publishing book, the familiar volumes with sepia covers on local topics. The two civil engineers find inspiration in the historic engineering achievements that made life in south Louisiana possible, and they want to share those accomplishments with the people of Louisiana!

& Sunday at 3 p.m. at the Maple Leaf Bar is the Maple Leaf Reading Series, the oldest continuous reading series in the south, founded by Everette Maddox. This week Poet Laureate Emeritus July Kane visits and reads. In the back patio, weather permitting. Periodic features and an open mic every Sunday.

& At Garden District Book Shop from 4-6 p.m. Sunday Frederick Starr and Robert Brantley present Une Belle Maison: The Lombard Plantation House in New Orlean’s Bywater. This is the story of the rise, fall, and eventual resurrection of one of America’s finest extant examples of West Indian Creole architecture and of the entire neighborhood of which it is an anchor. Through meticulous study of archives and archeology, the author presents fascinating insights on how residents of this working plantation actually lived

& WhoDatPoets.com lists four Spoken Word shows on Sunday nights: The new Sunday show from Spoken Word New Orleans is Poetry and Paint Brushes. Spoken Word artists perform as a resident artist sketches the performers. Doors at 7 pm. and show at 8 pm. at Special Tea, 4337 Banks Street. There are also open mics at The Black Star Cafe, 800 Belleville St. in Algiers at 7 p.m.; The Shadowbox Theater at 2400 St.Claude Ave. at 6 p.m.; Espe’s Kitchen, 1743 N Broad St. at 7 p.m.; and, the Therapy Wine Lounge, 3001 Tulane Ave., doors at 9 p.m., Admission $5. For phone numbers with more details on all these readings visit WHODATPOETS.COM.

& Monday night The Fiction Writers Group at the East Jefferson Regional Library will host guest author Anita Paul at 7 p.m. A communications specialist, Paul is known as “The Author’s Midwife.” She coaches and mentors corporate professionals and successful entrepreneurs to become published authors. Through her Write Your Life program, she shares strategies for writing, publishing, and marketing a book … and then leveraging it to upsell your expertise. Paul is the author of three books: Take the Mystery Out of Marketing (2002), What Goes Around Comes Around (a novel), and Write Your Life: Create Your Ideal Life And the Book You’ve Been Wanting to Write.

& Susan Larson, the former book editor of the former Times-Picayune newspaper and member of the National Book Critics Circle hosts The Reading Life on WWNO (89.9 FM) on Tuesdays at 1:30 p.m. She features interviews with authors of local and national interest.

& Octavia Books hosts an afteroon signing at 2 p.m. with noted photographer Richard Sexton and writers Randy Harelson and Brian Costello featuring their book, NEW ROADS AND OLD RIVERS: Louisiana’s Historic Pointe Coupee Parish. New Roads and Old Rivers reveals the natural and cultural vitality of Pointe Coupee Parish, Louisiana, as seen in the stunning photographs of Richard Sexton, with text by Randy Harelson and Brian Costello. Pointe Coupee is one of the oldest settlements in the Mississippi Valley, dating to the 1720s

& Also on Tuesday the Jefferson Parish Library Writers Group meets at the Westwego library from 7-9 pm.

& Every Tuesday night get on the list to spit at the longest running spoken word venue in New Orleans at Sweet Lorraine’s Jazz Club hosted by African-American Shakespear. Doors open at 7pm and the Mic pops at 8pm. It is $5 to get in.

Every Wednesday at Buffa’s in the back room there will be music and poetry hosted by Laura Mattingly from 7-8 p.m. followed by an open mic open to all performers: musicians, poets, comics.

& This Wednesday Esoterotica presents “Erotica in Action,” an evening of (writing about) favorite sex acts at the Always Lounge, doors at 7 p.m. and show at 8 p.m. By donation.

Here On This Thin Raft July 15, 2013

Posted by The Typist in Toulouse Street.
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“I love the friends I have gathered together here on this thin raft”
— Jim Morrison

Bastille Day July 14, 2013

Posted by The Typist in Toulouse Street.
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Nous armure les levées avec leurs crânes

Odd Bits of Life in New Orleans

La Marsellaise is such a lovely song.

Aux armes, citoyens ! To arms, citizens!
Formez vos bataillons ! Form your battalions!
Marchons, marchons ! Let’s march, let’s march!
Qu’un sang impur May a tainted blood
Abreuve nos sillons ! Soak our furrows!
Aux armes, citoyens ! To arms, citizens!
Formons nos bataillons ! Let us form our battalions!
Marchons, marchons ! Let us march, let us march!
Qu’un sang impur May their tainted blood
Abreuve nos sillons ! Soak our furrows!

How would you say in French: We will armor the levees with their skulls?

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The Two O’clock Morning Moon July 14, 2013

Posted by The Typist in cryptical envelopment, New Orleans, The Narrative, The Typist, Toulouse Street.
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Your eyes, she said, flashing a wide, coed smile, they are so bloodshot.

Allergies, I replied.

To what?

Pabst Blue Ribbon and the two o’clock morning moon.

Not quite, not here, not now July 13, 2013

Posted by The Typist in cryptical envelopment, New Orleans, The Narrative, The Typist, Toulouse Street.
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The twitchy flicker of Facebook and G Mail visible over your shoulder give the  lie to the technical book open on the coffee shop table, my own inevitable distraction by the Doric perfection of a woman’s neck with her  hair put up reflected by your MacBook. I should follow the glances over your  shoulder to your table with some remark about Facebook versus textbook but somewhere on the path between distraction and commitment, infatuation and an evenings obligations my feet stray instead to the counter for a refill, victim to my clumsiness with introductions.

I’ve moved out of the sun and can no longer see your screen, cannot tell if holding your highlighter aloft signals concentration or surrender, is a caution or an invitation. I am now a quadrant beyond a glance, for all intents invisible, nose down typing anyway, turning my citron green tea fantasy into words, without the sketching artist’s excuse to stare, the escalation of glances that lead toward your empty chair.

Odd Words July 11, 2013

Posted by The Typist in Toulouse Street.
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Updated! Algiers’s Hubbell Library Celebration Saturday and a Hemingway reading contest Sunday top the list of events this week in Odd Words. (Yes, I know it’s only Wednesday. We’re up early so you don’t have to be. Go ahead. Have another beer).

& Thursday, July 11 at 5:30 p.m. the Garden District Book Shop hosts Brett Martin and Difficult Men: Behind the Scenes of a Creative Revolution: from the Sopranos and the Wire to Mad Men and Breaking Bad, “[a] riveting and revealing look at the shows that helped cable television drama emerge as the signature art form of the twenty-first century.”

& Since the end of 17 Poets! spring season, a small group of poets have been meeting up at Flora’s Coffee Shop and Gallery around eight or nine on Thursdays to sit, visit and occasionally read a poem. The first order of business is to figure out whether the breeze is blowing on Royal or Franklin. An entirely relaxing way to spend an evening if you love poetry and the least intimidating venue possible if you have hesitated to read in public before.

& On Saturday the New Orleans Public Library and Friends of the Hubbell Library will host a celebration of the branch’s reopening in its original location, 725 Pelican St. Events include: 10:30 a.m. – Storytime with Miss Domonique; 11 a.m. – Calliope Puppets Performance; Noon – Storytime; 1 p.m. – Poppy Tooker Author Talk & Book Signing; 2 p.m. – Rick Trolsen & Friends; 3 p.m. – Egg Yolk Jubilee. There will be library tours, games, music, crafts with Confetti Kids, and more throughout the day of the Community Celebration

& Sunday at noon the final event of the annual San Fermin Nueva Orleans will be El Pobre de Mi!, featuring interpretive readings of the work of Ernest Hemmingway and a Hemmingway look-alike contest. The event features music by Pobre Calle Banda (marching band), burlesque by Roxie Le Rouge, The Pussyfooters, Mystic Ponies Aerial Troupe, Hemingway Readings by renowned local authors, brunch menu and drink specials by The Maison. There will be an interpretive reading contest open to the public. Visit the event’s Facebook page for details on how to enter.

& On Sunday at 2 p.m. Garden District Books features Ramon Antonio Vargas’ Fight, Grin and Squarely Play the Game: The 1945 Loyola New Orleans Basketball Championship and Legacy. In 1945, the Loyola New Orleans Wolf Pack became the city’s first basketball team to earn a national championship. The Cinderella season was chronicled in the “Times Picayune,” the student newspaper “The Maroon” and letters from students and alums fighting overseas. Take a courtside seat as journalist Ramon A. Vargas chronicles the season, including heartfelt personal narratives to tell the story of the championship and legacy of a team that led Loyola to national prominence

& Sunday at 3 p.m. at the Maple Leaf Bar is the Maple Leaf Reading Series, the oldest continuous reading series in the south, founded by Everette Maddox. This week poet/songwriter Mike True reads from his work. In the back patio, weather permitting. Periodic features and an open mic every Sunday.

& The new Sunday show from Spoken Word New Orleans is Poetry and Paint Brushes. Spoken Word artists perform as a resident artist sketches the performers. Doors at 7 pm. and show at 8 pm. at Special Tea, 4337 Banks Street.

& The New Orleans Haiku Society shares Haiku on the third Monday of every month at the Latter Branch Library, 5120 St. Charles Ave., from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. All are invited to attend. For more information call 596-2625.

& Susan Larson, the former book editor of the former Times-Picayune newspaper and member of the National Book Critics Circle hosts The Reading Life on WWNO (89.9 FM) on Tuesdays at 1:30 p.m. She features interviews with authors of local and national interest.

& Also on Tuesday the Jefferson Parish Library Writers Group meets at the Westwego library from 7-9 pm.

& Every Tuesday night get on the list to spit at the longest running spoken word venue in New Orleans at Sweet Lorraine’s Jazz Club hosted by African-American Shakespear. Doors open at 7pm and the Mic pops at 8pm. It is $5 to get in.

Every Wednesday at Buffa’s in the back room there will be music and poetry hosted by Laura Mattingly from 7-8 p.m. followed by an open mic open to all performers: musicians, poets, comics.

& Wednesday at 6 p.m. Garden District Book Shop presents Jerry DeWitt with Ethan Brown:Hope After Faith, “[a] former Louisiana pastor’s courageous memoir chronicling his conversion to atheism.” DeWitt was a pastor in the town of DeRidder, Louisiana, and was a fixture of the community. In private, however, he’d begun to question his faith. Late one night in May 2011, a member of his flock called seeking prayer for her brother who had been in a serious accident. As DeWitt searched for the right words to console her, speech failed him, and he found that the faith which once had formed the cornerstone of his life had finally crumbled to dust. When it became public knowledge that DeWitt was now an atheist, he found himself shunned by much of DeRidder’s highly religious community, losing nearly everything he’d known.

& Coming up in July, the New Orleans Museum of Art Book Club will meet Thursday, July 25, 12 p.m. to discuss The $12 Million Stuffed Shark by Don Thompson and Seven Days in the Art World by Sarah Thornton Both books are interesting reads: choose one or both! All programs start promptly at noon; please come at 11:30 if you would like to meet with friends first. NOMA will provide water and soft drinks. If you will be attending, contact Sheila Cork at scork@noma.org or (504) 658-4117

Odd Words New Logo July 11, 2013

Posted by The Typist in Toulouse Street.
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Odd Words New Logo

Odd Words is changing its logo because–I know this will come as a shock to many of you–Facebook is a pain in the ass. After a year of paying them to promote the weekly column and daily updates on Facebook they have started enforcing a provision in their guidelines about how much text you can have in a post image. Every day in every way Facebook gets worser and worser.

Odd Words July 10, 2013

Posted by The Typist in Toulouse Street.
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Algiers’s Hubbell Library Celebration Saturday and a Hemingway reading contest Sunday top the list of events this week in Odd Words. (Yes, I know it’s only Wednesday. We’re up early so you don’t have to be. Go ahead. Have another beer).

& Thursday, July 11 at 5:30 p.m. the Garden District Book Shop hosts Brett Martin and Difficult Men: Behind the Scenes of a Creative Revolution: from the Sopranos and the Wire to Mad Men and Breaking Bad, “[a] riveting and revealing look at the shows that helped cable television drama emerge as the signature art form of the twenty-first century.”

& Since the end of 17 Poets! spring season, a small group of poets have been meeting up at Flora’s Coffee Shop and Gallery around eight or nine on Thursdays to sit, visit and occasionally read a poem. The first order of business is to figure out whether the breeze is blowing on Royal or Franklin. An entirely relaxing way to spend an evening if you love poetry and the least intimidating venue possible if you have hesitated to read in public before.

& On Saturday the New Orleans Public Library and Friends of the Hubbell Library will host a celebration of the branch’s reopening in its original location, 725 Pelican St. Events include: 10:30 a.m. – Storytime with Miss Domonique; 11 a.m. – Calliope Puppets Performance; Noon – Storytime; 1 p.m. – Poppy Tooker Author Talk & Book Signing; 2 p.m. – Rick Trolsen & Friends; 3 p.m. – Egg Yolk Jubilee. There will be library tours, games, music, crafts with Confetti Kids, and more throughout the day of the Community Celebration

& Sunday at noon the final event of the annual San Fermin Nueva Orleans will be El Pobre de Mi!, featuring interpretive readings of the work of Ernest Hemmingway and a Hemmingway look-alike contest. The event features music by Pobre Calle Banda (marching band), burlesque by Roxie Le Rouge, The Pussyfooters, Mystic Ponies Aerial Troupe, Hemingway Readings by renowned local authors, brunch menu and drink specials by The Maison. There will be an interpretive reading contest open to the public. Visit the event’s Facebook page for details on how to enter.

& On Sunday at 2 p.m. Garden District Books features Ramon Antonio Vargas’ Fight, Grin and Squarely Play the Game: The 1945 Loyola New Orleans Basketball Championship and Legacy. In 1945, the Loyola New Orleans Wolf Pack became the city’s first basketball team to earn a national championship. The Cinderella season was chronicled in the “Times Picayune,” the student newspaper “The Maroon” and letters from students and alums fighting overseas. Take a courtside seat as journalist Ramon A. Vargas chronicles the season, including heartfelt personal narratives to tell the story of the championship and legacy of a team that led Loyola to national prominence

& Sunday at 3 p.m. at the Maple Leaf Bar is the Maple Leaf Reading Series, the oldest continuous reading series in the south, founded by Everette Maddox. This week poet/songwriter Mike True reads from his work. In the back patio, weather permitting. Periodic features and an open mic every Sunday.

& The new Sunday show from Spoken Word New Orleans is Poetry and Paint Brushes. Spoken Word artists perform as a resident artist sketches the performers. Doors at 7 pm. and show at 8 pm. at Special Tea, 4337 Banks Street.

& Susan Larson, the former book editor of the former Times-Picayune newspaper and member of the National Book Critics Circle hosts The Reading Life on WWNO (89.9 FM) on Tuesdays at 1:30 p.m. She features interviews with authors of local and national interest.

& Also on Tuesday the Jefferson Parish Library Writers Group meets at the Westwego library from 7-9 pm.

Every Wednesday at Buffa’s in the back room there will be music and poetry hosted by Laura Mattingly from 7-8 p.m. followed by an open mic open to all performers: musicians, poets, comics.

& Wednesday at 6 p.m. Garden District Book Shop presents Jerry DeWitt with Ethan Brown:Hope After Faith, “[a] former Louisiana pastor’s courageous memoir chronicling his conversion to atheism.” DeWitt was a pastor in the town of DeRidder, Louisiana, and was a fixture of the community. In private, however, he’d begun to question his faith. Late one night in May 2011, a member of his flock called seeking prayer for her brother who had been in a serious accident. As DeWitt searched for the right words to console her, speech failed him, and he found that the faith which once had formed the cornerstone of his life had finally crumbled to dust. When it became public knowledge that DeWitt was now an atheist, he found himself shunned by much of DeRidder’s highly religious community, losing nearly everything he’d known.

& Coming up in July, the New Orleans Museum of Art Book Club will meet Thursday, July 25, 12 p.m. to discuss The $12 Million Stuffed Shark by Don Thompson and Seven Days in the Art World by Sarah Thornton Both books are interesting reads: choose one or both! All programs start promptly at noon; please come at 11:30 if you would like to meet with friends first. NOMA will provide water and soft drinks. If you will be attending, contact Sheila Cork at scork@noma.org or (504) 658-4117

Odd Words July 4, 2013

Posted by The Typist in books, literature, New Orleans, NOLA, novel, Odd Words, Poetry, publishing, Toulouse Street.
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This weekend marks the Community Book Center’s 30th anniversary. This Afro-centric New Orleans institution–part bookstore, part art gallery, part meeting place–invites the entire community to join and celebrate with a full weekend of events, including:

  • Friday, July 5: Musical Interlude with special guest “Jiar” (10 a.m. and 12:30 p.m.). “Peace Talks: Ending Monkey Chatter” ith the Rev. Dr. Denise L. Graves (11 am-noon); Creole Cooking Demonstration with Chef D from 1-3 p.m., more music and a discussion of the book Wretched of the Earth by Frantz Fannon, a a Fish Fry, Music and Dancing starting at 4 p.m. (donation: $10).
  • Saturday, July 6: An Education Panel Discussion led by Dr. Adrienne D. Dixon, author of The Handbook of Critical Race Theory in Education (10 am – noon); artist Amy Bryan hosting a children’s workshop (noon – 2 p.m.); reading and signing by Dr. Mona Lisa Saloy, author of Red Beans and Ricely Yours (2-4 p.m.); Reading and signing by Iyanla Vanzant, author of Peace from Broken Pieces (4 p.m.); and finally solo guitarist Renard Boissier sings and plays ( 7 p.m. $10 donation).
  • The weekend closes out Sunday July 7 with a Sunday Jazz Brunch featuring trumpeter Mario Abney (11 a.m. – 2 p.m. Donation of $15 for adults, $5 for children).

& I just visited with Jimmy Ross and he’s pretty sure there won’t be any poets hanging around outside Flora Coffee Shop and Gallery this Thursday what with the fireworks and all. Look for this meeting the following week.

& The New Orleans Public Library Calendar announces that the Hubbell Branch Library will be closed from July 4-9, reopening on July 10. NOPL will be closed system wide on July 4th of course, and the Jefferson Parish library will be closed July 4 and 5. Be sure to check the NOPL’s website for all kinds of events for all ages to numerous to list here. You can find the Jefferson Parish Library’s calendar here.

& On Friday at 6 p.m., Octavia Books hosts author/actress Victoria Rowell — Drucilla on “The Young and the Restless” — returns to Octavia Books to read from and sign her new novel, THE YOUNG AND THE RUTHLESS, another hilarious and shocking send-up of the soap opera world.

& Saturday’s Poetry Buffet at the Latter Memorial Library will feature New Orleans Poets Reading New Orleans Poets at 2 p.m.

& Sunday at 3 p.m. at the Maple Leaf Bar is the Maple Leaf Reading Series, the oldest continuous reading series in the south, founded by Everette Maddox. Poets Billy Bonsach and Julian Stock read this Sunday. In the back patio, weather permitting. Periodic features and an open mic every Sunday.

& The new Sunday show from Spoken Word New Orleans is Poetry and Paint Brushes. Spoken Word artists perform as a resident artist sketches the performers. Doors at 7 pm. and show at 8 pm. at Special Tea, 4337 Banks Street.

& Susan Larson, the former book editor of the former Times-Picayune newspaper and member of the National Book Critics Circle hosts The Reading Life on WWNO (89.9 FM) on Tuesdays at 1:30 p.m. She features interviews with authors of local and national interest.

& Also on Tuesday the Jefferson Parish Library Writers Group meets at the Westwego library from 7-9 pm.

Every Wednesday at Buffa’s in the back room there will be music and poetry hosted by Laura Mattingly from 7-8 p.m. followed by an open mic.

Wednesday at 6 p.m. Octavia Books hosts Peter M. Wolf and his book MY NEW ORLEANS, GONE AWAY: A Memoir of Loss and Renewal. “I adore this book and read it in a kind of dreamy fog, unable to put it down and think of anything else. It strikes just the perfect note for a New Orleans memoir, smart and graceful, with the affectionate heart of a native son and the clear eyes and keen intelligence of a scholar of cities. And it’s a very brave book, coming from a man who’s struggled and taken risks for his passions.” Susan Larson, The Reading Life, WWNO.

Wednesday night Esoterotica is back with Esoterotica Presents “Sexmas in July” Provocateur’s Secret Santa, in which various provocateurs read a piece written about another whose name was drawn from a hat. And I have absolutely no idea what Oddball is going to have to say about Mr. Funky, but I promise: it will be funky. Or vaguely Japanese. Or something. What does Mr. Funky wear under his hakama? This group consistently produces some of the best writing and performance of any semi-open mic event in New Orleans and I highly recommend you check it out. Or, as Jim Morrison asks in the Oliver Stone film The Doors, “Where’s your will be to weird?”

Also on Wednesday the Louisiana Endorsement for the Humanities celebrates the new issue its magazine Louisiana Cultural Vistas with Abita Brewery and Zapp’s Potato Chips and three contributors discussing three compelling topics: Photographer Ralph Burns reviews his portfolio of photos from 1970’s New Orleans; Assistant Warden Cathy Fontenot of Louisiana State Penitentiary talks about the history of the Red Hat Cellblock at Angola; Matt Sakakeeny reviews the evolution of noise regulation in New Orleans. Doors open at 6pm and the party is free to the public. We’ll be live-tweeting at @knowlouisiana, and free Abita and Zapp’s will flow.