jump to navigation

Burning the Roman Candle at Both Ends May 31, 2013

Posted by The Typist in cryptical envelopment, New Orleans, The Narrative, The Typist, Toulouse Street.
add a comment
Handbill art by K Switzer  for the play CRAVE for The Catastrophic Theater, found as I cleaned out old papers

Handbill art by K Switzer for the play CRAVE for The Catastrophic Theater, found as I cleaned out old papers

Kerouac: “…the only people for me are the mad ones, the ones who are mad to live, mad to talk, mad to be saved, desirous of everything at the same time, the ones who never yawn or say a commonplace thing, but burn, burn, burn like fabulous yellow roman candles exploding like spiders across the stars.”

Strike a match. Strike another. Burn them all.

From About Toulouse Street: ” It is, to borrow novelist Tim O’Brien’s line: A Fiction. It is loosely based on the life of a man of late middle age racing frantically towards and away from death.”

You will never remember finishing the race. What matters is the pain and elation of the running, the clatter of the keyboard instead of the patter of running shoes.

“Beckett: “I write about myself with the same pencil and in the same exercise book as about him. It is no longer I, but another whose life is just beginning.”

When we cease to transform we cease to live.

Frazier: “Kill the head and the body will die.”

Today is a good day to die. Today is a good day to live beyond any rational capacity.

Stevens: “These two things are one. (Pages of illustrations.)”

Odd Words May 30, 2013

Posted by The Typist in books, literature, New Orleans, novel, Odd Words, Poetry, publishing, Toulouse Street.
Tags: , , ,
add a comment

Bloomsday, the celebration of James Joyce’s Ulyssses, returns to New Orleans and the Irish House on June 16, organizer Micheal Zell has announced. The entire action of the novel is set on June 16 in Dublin, Ireland, and all across the world fans of Joyce celebrate with a day of readings and other festivities. Come read or just join us and enjoy good food and drink. All are welcome to read, up to 10 minutes max. Featuring guest readers: John Joyce, The Brothers Goat (Michael Jeffrey Lee & Christopher Hellwig), Vincent Cellucci, Pandora Gastelum, Herbert Kearney, and Susan Larson. This year’s celebration will be starting at 2 p.m. instead of breakfast.

On June 5-8 New Orleans, Louisiana will host the 21th Annual Southern Fried Poetry Slam for the first time since Hurricane Katrina. The four-day festival is slated to take place in downtown New Orleans. The Southern Fried Poetry Slam will be expected to attract over two hundred people. The literary competition features preliminary bouts and culminates in the Southern Fried Poetry Slam Finals on Saturday, June 8, 2013. In addition to the commemorative Moon Pies and RC Colas of Southern Fried tradition, this year’s champions will receive over $6500 in cash and various prizes as well as a couple local merchant wears. You can get more details on events and venues on the Facebook page.

& The Thursday night poetry scene continues at Flora’s Coffee Shop with an evening of poetry featuring Chris Carries and Quess? followed by the open mic at 8 p.m. t Flora Gallery and Coffee Shop is located at 2600 Royal St. at the corner of Franklin Ave. Carrier is the author of Mantle and After Dayton and several chapbooks. He earned an MFA from the Program for Poets and Writers at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. Currently, he divides his time between Lafayette, where he is pursuing a PhD in English (with a concentration in creative writing) at the University of Louisiana, and Clarksville, AR, where he lives with his person Dawn Holder. Michael “Quess?” Moore is a poet, educator, and an actor in that order. His writing and work with youth as a poet led him to the classroom where he most recently spent four years as an English teacher—3 as a middle school teacher at Martin Behrman Charter Elementary and one as a freshman teacher in NOCCA’s Academic Studio. He is a founding member of Team SNO (Slam New Orleans), New Orleans’ first slam poetry team since Katrina, and the only 2 time national championship team the city has ever produced. He’s also a member of VOIC’D (Voices Organized in Creative Dissent), a collective of actors with a focus on social justice, whose last production, “Lockdown,” received critical acclaim and sold out audiences several nights in a row. He has produced a self-titled CD, “A Scribe Called Quess?” and his debut book of poetry, Blind Visionz, can be found at http://www.lulu.com

& Also on Thursday evening the Alvar Branch Library hosts an evening of poetry at 7 p.m. featuring Chris Champagne, Kelly Harris DeBerry, Jonathan Kline, and Valentine Pierce read from their work. Come for the poetry! Stay for the pie! This month features poets Liz Green, Krystal Languell, and Robert Alan Wendeborn: Green grew up in New Jersey and received her MFA from Warren Wilson College. An associate poetry editor at H_NGM_N Books, she works as a mental health counselor in New Orleans. Recent work has appeared in Forklift, Ohio, H_NGM_N, and on Anderbo.com. Languell is treasurer and member of the board of directors for the Belladonna* Collaborative. She also edits the feminist journal Bone Bouquet and teaches writing in NYC. Her first book, Call the Catastrophists, is now available from BlazeVox Books. Wendeborn lives and writes in Portland, OR. His poems and reviews can be found in The Collagist, >kill author, PANK, and other cool places. He blogs for Uncanny Valley, and you can follow him on Twitter @rawbbie.

& This Friday Spoken Word New Orleans hosts a very special show at Special Tea at 8 p.m. call The Retro Mic, dedicated to the “old heads”. Spoken Word New Orleans organizer Lionel King says, “I called up a few of my old poetry friends and we decided to get together and have a lil poetic fun. Already confirmed Hollywood, Shedrick White, Benjamin, Danielle, Erica Murray, Ginger, Butter, Peaches, and a very special guest. This is one of those show you don’t want to miss. Watch the architects show you how they build this scene.” Hosted by Lionel King. Admission $5.

Maple Street Book Shop moves the monthly Diane Tapes reading this Friday to the Maple Street shop at 6 p.m. for featured poets Liz Green, Krystal Languell, and Robert Alan Wendeborn. Green grew up in New Jersey and received her MFA from Warren Wilson College. An associate poetry editor at H_NGM_N Books, she works as a mental health counselor in New Orleans. Recent work has appeared in Forklift, Ohio, H_NGM_N, and on Anderbo.com. Languell is treasurer and member of the board of directors for the Belladonna Collaborative. She also edits the feminist journal Bone Bouquet and teaches writing in NYC. Her first book, Call the Catastrophists, is now available from BlazeVox Books. Wendeborn lives and writes in Portland, OR. His poems and reviews can be found in The Collagist, >kill author, PANK, and other cool places. He blogs for Uncanny Valley, and you can follow him on Twitter @rawbbie

& On Saturday the Latter Memorial Library’s monthly Poetry Buffet changes the menu to feature creative non-fiction read by Constance Adler, Karen Celestan, Bill Lavender, and Patrice Melnick at 2 p.m.

& Storytime with Miss Maureen at Maple Street Uptown features The Chicken Sisters by Laura Numeroff at 11:30 am.

& Saturday the New Orleans Public Library kicks off its Summer Reading Program for children and teenagers with special events at branches all over the city. You can get the details for your local branch on the library schedule on the Nutrias.org website by following this link, and a full listing of programs through the summer here.

& The new Sunday show from Spoken Word New Orleans is Poetry and Paint Brushes. Spoken Word artists perform as a resident artists paints the crowd and performers. At 6 p.m. at Special Tea, 4337 Banks Street. No longer at the Bayou Road location.

& On the second, fourth, and fifth Sunday of each month, Jenna Mae hosts poets and spoken-word readers at 8:00 p.m. at the Fair Grinds Coffee House on 3133 Ponce de Leon St.

& Susan Larson, the former book editor of the former Times-Picayune newspaper and member of the National Book Critics Circle hosts The Reading Life on WWNO (89.9 FM) on Tuesdays at 1:30 p.m. She features interviews with authors of local and national interest.

& Tuesday Octavia Books features a presentation and signing with Claire Manes at 6 p.m. featuring OUT OF THE SHADOW OF LEPROSY: The Carville Letters and Stories of the Landry Family. In 1924 when thirty-two-year-old Edmond Landry kissed his family good-bye and left for the leprosarium in Carville, Louisiana, leprosy, now referred to as Hansen’s Disease, stigmatized and disfigured but did not kill. Those with leprosy were incarcerated in the federal hospital and isolated from family and community. Phones were unavailable, transportation was precarious, and fear was rampant. Edmond entered the hospital (as did his four other siblings), but he did not surrender to his fate. He fought with his pen and his limited energy to stay connected to his family and to improve living conditions for himself and other patients.

& Adrian Van Young and Michael Jeffrey Lee will be at Maple Street Book Shop’s Bayou St. John location Tuesday, May 4th, at 6PM. Adrian Van Young will be signing his newest book, The Man Who Noticed Everything, while Michael Jeffrey Lee will be signing his collection Something in My Eye. has taught writing at Boston College, Boston University and Grub Street Writers, a creative writing non-profit. In fall 2013, he will begin teaching creative writing and composition at Tulane University. He received his B.A. in English from Vassar College, and his MFA in fiction from Columbia University, where he formerly taught as well. In 2008, he was the recipient of a Henfield Foundation Prize and was nominated by Columbia’s faculty for inclusion in the Best New American Voices 2010 Anthology. Lee’s stories are bizarre and smart and stilted, like dystopic fables told by a redneck Samuel Beckett. Outcasts hunker under bridges, or hole up in bars, waiting for the hurricane to hit. Lee’s forests are full of menace too-unseen crowds gather at the tree-line, and bands of petty crooks and marauders bluster their way into suicidal games of one-upmanship. In Something In My Eye, violence and idleness are always in tension, ratcheting up and down with an eerie and effortless force. Diction leaps between registers with the same vertiginous swoops, moving from courtly formality to the funk and texture of a slang that is all the characters’ own. It’s a masterful performance, and Lee’s inventiveness accomplishes that very rare feat-hyper-stylized structure and language that achieve clarity out of turbulence, never allowing technique to obscure what’s most important: a direct address that makes visible all those we’d rather not see.

& The First Tuesday Book Club meets at Maple Street Book Shop’s Uptown location at 5:45 PM the first Tuesday of every month. June’s book is On the Rez by Ian Frazier. Book club books are always 10% off at Maple Street Book Shop. On the Rez is a sharp, unflinching account of the modern-day American Indian experience, especially that of the Oglala Sioux, who now live on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in the plains and badlands of the American West.
& Every Tuesday at 6 p.m. the Barnes & Noble West Bank hosts Westbank Writers’ Group. Every is welcome, from novices to serious authors. Join us for inspiration, friendly critiques, or just to connect with other local writers.

& On Wednesday Esoterotica hosts a new show on “True Confessions” featuring erotic writing at the Allways Lounge, with doors at 7 and show at 8 p.m. A donation is requested. Odd Words visited week before last and this is an electrically charged evening with a good dose of fun (and a drinking game, at least at the last one). Highly recommended for those who think the tongue, ear and brain are among the most important erogenous zones.

& The Jefferson Parish Public Library hosts an Author Event! Wednesday at Jean Morgan Meaux, In Pursuit of Alaska at 7 p.m. in the East Bank Regional Library Jefferson Room. Most Americans wouldn’t recognize their names: Charles Hallock, Caroline Willard, Harry de Windt, Mary Hitchock. Yet, their stories are as integral to the larger story of America as anyone’s, says Jean Morgan Meaux, who has written about these and 23 other “hardy souls” who in the 19th and early 20th century traveled to Alaska to discover and record the last and largest of American frontiers. The book, In Pursuit of Alaska: An Anthology of Travelers’ Tales 1879-1909 is a labor of love for Meaux, who began compiling the first-person accounts from the Alaskan wilderness in the 1980s, when she was a resident of the state

& Bloomsday in New Orleans

& Coming up in June the Louisiana Humanities Center will host “Tuesdays with Earl,” a five-week lunchtime reading series. Participants are invited to bring their lunches for a scholar-led conversation about Earl of Louisiana, the 1961 book by legendary author A.J. Liebling. The one-hour sessions will take place every Tuesday at noon, from June 18 through July 16 at the Louisiana Humanities Center at 938 Lafayette Street. Enrollment is free but limited to 40 people. To sign up, email boyles@leh.org.

Odd Words: Saints and Sinners Festival May 26, 2013

Posted by The Typist in books, literature, New Orleans, Odd Words, Toulouse Street.
Tags: ,
add a comment

Thanks to local poet and writing educator Brad Richard for contributing a write-up of the Saints and Sinners LGBT Literary Festival in New Orleans:

May 25, 2013
The 10th Annual Saints and Sinners Festival, New Orleans

By Brad Richard

My first involvement with the Saints and Sinners Festival (a fundraiser for the NO/AIDS Task Force) was as moderator of the poetry panel in 2004, with, I believe, Jeff Mann, Trebor Healy, and Kay Murphy. I’d been to other writers’ conferences, but never one for LGBT writers—no surprise, as there weren’t many at the time, and they’re still somewhat scarce. Frankly, it wasn’t something I was even certain I wanted to do: I was a writer, I was gay, but was I a “gay writer”? Still I appreciated Paul Willis’ invitation, and I was relieved when he warned me not to get too academic, although that also left me unsure of what to expect. Cutting to the chase: I met great people, I partied, I had some of the best conversations about literature and life that I’ve ever had in any context, my eyes were opened to amazing writing I wouldn’t have otherwise encountered—and, in 2011, I met Bryan Borland, publisher of Sibling Rivalry Press, who would bring out my third book. For all these reasons of literature and community and sheer good fortune, I look forward to this festival with pride and gratitude every year.
This year, I arrived at 10 AM on Saturday to do some low-intensity volunteer work, taking an attendance count at a couple of panels. I sat in on the panel “AIDS Is Still with Us: Telling an Essential Story,” moderated by publisher Jameson Currier, with panelists Andrew Holleran, Trebor Healy, Lewis DeSimone, and Daniel M. Jaffe. The tone was somber and sardonic as the four writers took up Currier’s interesting and important questions, including the provocative, “Do you think AIDS literature has longevity?” The panelists’ answers ended up providing an instructive overview and multi-faceted reflection on the history of the HIV/AIDS pandemic in the US as experienced by gay white men from 80s through the present. More than one panelist remarked that HIV/AIDS as a topic for fiction seemed absent in much contemporary fiction (along with earnest appeals for young people to tell their stories), although current documentaries such as We Were Here, How to Survive a Plague, and United in Anger, all dealing with the story of ACT UP’s crucial activism in the heat of the crisis, show that there’s an interest in that phase of the AIDS pandemic as part of queer history. The panelists grappled with the fact that their experience of AIDS, as men who either came of age in the 80s or were already active in the gay scene, was completely different from that of younger people, many of whom may only see HIV/AIDS as a manageable condition, not the nearly immediate death sentence it was back then. DeSimone mentioned giving a reading recently, which included an AIDS death scene, and being taken to task by an older man for having written that—apparently, as DeSimone speculated, because the man was still dealing with not just AIDS fatigue, but also AIDS fiction fatigue. Holleran, in a parallel comment, discussed the difficult decision, when he was a columnist for Christopher Street in the 80s, to write about a disease people didn’t want to even talk about because it was such a downer. He tried alternating columns about AIDS with humorous ones; but soon, as he said, it was a monolith, “it was eating the culture.” It was impossible to write about anything else.
In the post-panel discussion, several audience members brought up the stories of HIV/AIDS among peoples of color, poor people, women, Haitians, Africans—in short, people who are not gay white men and whose communities have had very different experiences of HIV/AIDS. One man also mentioned the contingent of bisexual men who were part of early HIV/AIDS activism but whose stories were absorbed and lost within a larger narrative about men who identified as gay—a provocative point, since, ironically, gay men’s narrative of HIV/AIDS arguably gained the gay community a measure of sympathy, but at the expense, to some degree, of the real diversity of LGBT experience. As often happens with conference discussions, just as this became most interesting, we had to leave to make room for the next group; still, it was great to hear that conversation and see bridges starting to be built.
Later, I was a participant on this year’s poetry panel, which moderator Che Yeun had delightfully titled “Intro to Bodybuilding.” My co-panelists were Michael Montlack and Kay Murphy. Michael read a couple of poems from his first book, Cool Limbo, including the darkly funny “If Hello Kitty Had a Mouth” and the poignant “On Turning Forty.” He also read a new poem, “A Friend of Farrah,” which juxtaposed two cancer stories, Farrah Fawcett’s and his mother’s. Kay read typically tough, darkly comic poems dealing with addiction and illness, including a villanelle, “Undiagnosed,” about a recent bout of pneumonia; another villanelle, “Drinking”; and “Ode to Your Gall Bladder.” Her mastery of form made the poems real testaments of strength. Nervous as usual, I fumbled my way through introductory mumblings about the narrative body (whatever that is), and read poems from Butcher’s Sugar: “My Sixth Grade Sex Life: Milne Elementary, New Orleans,” “Night Lessons: A Writing Assignment,” and “Elegy in a Men’s Room.” The questions and panel discussion ranged across many topics, including the relation of our bodies to our writing practice, our sense of our bodies as history, and the body as source of pleasure and pain. The audience had tough questions, too, including “Does the fallibility of the body continue to inform your work?” and “Does it get easier dealing with mortality and the fact that your body doesn’t keep doing what you want it to?” Benjamin Morris finally asked if we’d all been thinking about mortality lately; I got a laugh when I said, “Most days!”
I left the festival for a while but returned to the Quarter in the evening for an offsite reading, at Gallery Orange, from Love, Christopher Street, an anthology, edited by Thomas Keith, of essays about LGBT experience in New York City. Many of the readings were funny and poignant (wonderful work from Michele Karlsberg, Fay Jacobs, Val McDermid, Charles Rice-Gonzalez, Shawn Syms, and Felice Picano) and others deeply moving, perhaps most particularly Martin Hyatt’s gripping, lyrical account of coming from rural Louisiana and becoming a writer and drug addict (his big addiction, ultimately: the city itself). “Maybe I’m like my Southern aunts,” said Hyatt: “I will tell you everything. Otherwise, I’ll tell you nothing.” His compelling voice, and the strong sense of the silence in the margins, brought the evening to a powerful close.
To myself from ten years ago, I can say what I already knew: yes, Brad, you are a gay writer—enjoy it! And to anyone who may be intrigued by any of this, whether you identify as LGBT or any other flavor of sexual or cultural identity (or saint or sinner, for that matter), check out next year’s festival! For an internationally known event, it remains a fairly well-kept local secret, and it would be fantastic to see even more local lovers of literature take part.

Jovenes May 24, 2013

Posted by The Typist in literature, New Orleans, Odd Words, Poetry, Toulouse Street.
Tags: ,
add a comment

Young Poets

From Poems and Antipoems by Nicanor Parra, edited & translated by Miller Williams.

Odd Words May 23, 2013

Posted by The Typist in books, literature, New Orleans, novel, Odd Words, Poetry, publishing, Toulouse Street.
add a comment

This weekend is the annual Saints and Sinners Literary Festival of GLBT lit. Odd Words won’t be going in person for the same reason I won’t offer a list of highlight, because I don’t know much about GLBT lit and who’s who in that world, but the Fest website calls out Dorothy Allison, Ellen Hart, Andrew Holleran, Ayana Mathis, Val McDermid, Felice Picano, and Justin Torres among the highlights. New Orleans own Brad Richard will be on the poetry panel INTRO TO BODYBUILDING, which features four poets discussing how their bodily experiences have informed their craft. I welcome any readers who want to submit a panel write up. Just contact me first to make sure someone else isn’t already sending something in on that speaker or panel. You can get all the festival details and pick your own highlights here at sasfest.org.

Some local publishing news: Lavender Ink Press has just released a spate of books that includes a collection of stories by Jimmy Ross, who has been a fixture on the local literary scene since the Navy accidentally sent him here as punishment, a novel by the amazing story teller Jonathan Kline and a new book of poems by Naropa-graduate and co-founder of 17 Poets! Megan Burns. You can see all of Lavendar’s titles on their website.

One last bit of news before we get to the listings: New Yorker Mark LaFluer, better known to many New Orleanians as the activist behind Levees Not War, received two starred reviews–in Publisher’s Weekly and The Kirkus Review, for his new novel Elysian Fields. If you had any lingering questions about the entire argument about boutique/self/cooperative publishing (or pick you own favorite term for it), this shows that quality work can still make it without a Big House.

& so to the listings, which are a bit thin with Saints & Sinner running this weekend.

& 17 POETS! Literary & Performance Series features poet, playwright & satirist JIMMY ROSS who will give a book signing and reading of his new book So What?! (Lavender Ink 2013). Also on this program, poet / spoken word artist Jonathan Brown gives a special performance. Open Mic follows the featured program, emceed by Jimmy Ross.

John Lacarbiere hosts a new weekly spoken word event Word Connections @ Juju Cafe, 5363 Franklin Avenue. starting at 5 p.m. Lacabriere is the man behind the events Word Connections, Sex Vs. Love, Venus Vs. Mars, For The Love of Poetry, Roof Top Conversations, Poetry on the Beach and promises “a weekly fix of good times with people you know and soon will know, words being shared, great food being served, drinks and laughter all night with the amazing ambiance.”

& Young Adult novelist Claudia Gray visits Octavia Books at 6 p.m with her brand new story, SPELLCASTER. Descended from witches, high school senior Nadia can tell as soon as her family moves to Captive’s Sound that the town is under a dark and powerful spell. Then she meets Mateo, the teenage local whose cursed dreams predict the future, and they must work together to prevent an impending disaster that threatens the entire town.

& Also tonight, Maple Street Book Shop’s Uptown mothership hosts Charles Finch signing the latest book in his Charles Lenox mystery series, A Death in the Small Hours,at 6 p.m.. Finch is a graduate of Yale and Oxford. He is the author of the Charles Lenox mysteries, including The Fleet Street Murders, The September Society, A Stranger in Mayfair, and A Burial at Sea. His first novel, A Beautiful Blue Death, was nominated for an Agatha Award and was named one of Library Journal’s Best Books of 2007, one of only five mystery novels on the list. He lives in Oxford, England.

& Saturday at Maple Street Books Uptown Story Time with Miss Maureen will feature The Chicken Sisters by Laura Numerof.

& The new Sunday show from Spoken Word New Orleans is Poetry and Paint Brushes. Spoken Word artists perform as a resident artists paints the crowd and performers. At 6 p.m. at Special Tea, 4337 Banks Street. No longer at the Bayou Road location.

& On the second, fourth, and fifth Sunday of each month, Jenna Mae hosts poets and spoken-word readers at 8:00 p.m. at the Fair Grinds Coffee House on 3133 Ponce de Leon St.

& All of the regional libraries will be closed Monday for Memorial Day.

& Susan Larson, the former book editor of the former Times-Picayune newspaper and member of the National Book Critics Circle hosts The Reading Life on WWNO (89.9 FM) on Tuesdays at 1:30 p.m. She features interviews with authors of local and national interest.

& Every Tuesday at 6 p.m. the Barnes & Noble West Bank hosts Westbank Writers’ Group. Every is welcome, from novices to serious authors. Join us for inspiration, friendly critiques, or just to connect with other local writers.

& Coming up in June the Louisiana Humanities Center will host “Tuesdays with Earl,” a five-week lunchtime reading series. Participants are invited to bring their lunches for a scholar-led conversation about Earl of Louisiana, the 1961 book by legendary author A.J. Liebling. The one-hour sessions will take place every Tuesday at noon, from June 18 through July 16 at the Louisiana Humanities Center at 938 Lafayette Street. Enrollment is free but limited to 40 people. To sign up, email boyles@leh.org.

Prismatic Transformation May 22, 2013

Posted by The Typist in cryptical envelopment, New Orleans, The Narrative, The Typist, Toulouse Street.
Tags: ,
add a comment

Sun Ra 1

Sun Ra’s Afro-Futurist vision can only be realized via prismatic transformation. Look into the black night sky spangled with uncountable stars of white, brown, red, yellow and yes, blue and black. Imagine yourself as one point in an immense gravitational web of space/time transformation. Close your eyes and wait for the first voice to pass and speak, without looking, “greetings, brother/sister. Welcome to your future.”

When the Music’s Over May 20, 2013

Posted by The Typist in cryptical envelopment, Dancing Bear, je me souviens, New Orleans, Remember, The Dead, The Narrative, The Typist, Toulouse Street.
Tags:
add a comment

…now night arrives with her purple legion
Retire now to your tents and to your dreams
Tomorrow we enter the town of my birth
I want to be ready

20130520-ray2-x600-1369086926Somewhere in the City of Lights tonight a single bulb fails to illuminate and that absence will be drowned in rivers of headlights and the sparkling hills. PG&E will not notice. The grid of copper and gold will continue to enfold us in its clutches. There is, however, another grid, an etheric one, that operates in that place where photon waves collapse into particles and the very air dances at frequencies only discernible to the ears of the so attuned. The minor catastrophe of the end of a single human life vibrates through that grid until it reaches every other life the lost one touched. A harmonic resonance begins which, left unchecked, could shatter the world, and only the countervailing vibration of Love that runs back through the etheric grid cancels it out and prevents cataclysm.

The old embed code no longer works on You Tube. When the Music’s Over.

RIP Ray Manzarek

Burning in Water, Drowning in Flame May 20, 2013

Posted by The Typist in New Orleans, The Narrative, The Typist, Toulouse Street.
Tags:
add a comment

It’s like sunshine, the pain. It’s burning all over my body.

Artist Justin Craun. Taken from Saatci Gallery website.

Artist Justin Craun. Taken from Saatci Gallery website.

Someone I know said that to me not long ago. She suffers from fibromyalgia. It is a deeply misunderstood condition causing serious, chronic pain. Many people including some physicians treat it as psychosomatic. It is poorly understood but is not. It is real and debilitating. If you or someone you know suffers from this condition, or if you don’t believe in it, please go read this excellent piece by the wonderful G Bitch.

Surrealistic Willow May 18, 2013

Posted by The Typist in cryptical envelopment, The Narrative, The Typist, Toulouse Street.
2 comments

weeping-willow

Willows are tricksters, roots exploring far beyond the canopy to play havoc with those who plant them unthinkingly in their monocultured and manicured lawn where no dandelion dare rear its head. You learn this later, after you have discovered the willow’s secret of invisibility as a child wandering the park with a cane pole and a bologna sandwich, the ability to vanish into the foliage out of the palpable but inaudible roar of summer’s furnace. Wait patiently for the fish who do not understand that the willow’s power of invisibility stops at the waterline. If the fish run slow, lay back on your split-root seat and watch the younger children who do not yet understand the willow’s power running in the stickery grass, observe the mysteries of couples wandering slowly, hand-in-hand in search of their own inconspicuous spots, the turtles camouflaged on their logs. Every good grouping of oleanders has its secret, dirt-flooded center and every child in the neighborhood knows these spots to spend languid afternoons in intermittent conversation or mischief. These are no match for the deep-canopied willow when afternoon’s hot breath rustles the leaves with a sound like cooling rain and you can sit, inconspicuously shaded, counting the toadstools and wondering if the little people your grandparents spoke of were not so much magic as wise, knowing where to hide when chatty women or rattling wagons passed on the road. Pick up a twig and whittle it clean, carve thoughtless patterns into the wood to pass the afternoon and then plant it in the earth, a mystic hobo sign for the crafty passerby.

Thinking Man’s Spam May 17, 2013

Posted by The Typist in cryptical envelopment, Fortin Street, New Orleans, Toulouse Street.
Tags: , ,
add a comment

Why, oh, why is this the most attractive post in five years for comment spammers?

Fellini’s beached monster November 16, 2007
Posted by Mark Folse in Debrisville, New Orelans, New Orleans, NOLA, Rebirth, Recovery, Remember, Toulouse Street.
Tags: Dante, Divine Comedy, Fellini, film, La Dolce Vita, New Orleans, NOLA

Sometimes at night the darkness and silence weighs on me. Peace frightens me. Perhaps I fear it most of all. I feel it’s only a facade, hiding the face of hell. I think of what’s in store for my children tomorrow; “The world will be wonderful”, they say; but from whose viewpoint? We need to live in a state of suspended animation, like a work of art; in a state of enchantment… detached. Detached.

— Divine Comedy The Certainty of Chance Lyrics
as a speech by Steiner in Fellini’s La Dolce Vita

No, I am not about to violently snap, like Steiner in La Dolce Vita. The speech always struck my differently, perhaps the way it struck Marcello in the film before the tragic murder-suicide, not as advice but as a framing for a life in a seemingly pointless universe. Isn’t that the way Marcello chooses to live in the end, almost in a state of suspended animation?

I have always found a strange sort of solace in what others might find depressing. I do not seek the peace which passeth understanding, except perhaps in despair as one might seek solace in drink or in death. Satori seems tempting, but strikes me as ultimately dehumanizing. I am not ready to surrender up my self and my suffering for an empty bliss. Instead I need to learn to survive in this world where the first noble truth is inscribed like scar tissue somewhere deep beneath the skin.

Here in the original land of misfit toys we call New Orleans we need to find the truth hidden in Dante’s speech as filtered through Fellini’s Steiner, not as Marcello did by embracing the emptiness but in our own way; not precisely in a state of suspended animation but instead isolated from the sterility of late American culture; by defining our own space, “like a work of art; in a state of enchantment…. detached”; defining our own fourth noble truth, our own Way of celebrating through the darkness that leads us to the light; leads us not to Fellini’s monster on the beach, but to the innocence of the girl on the strand.

We must not detach from our world, but from theirs, must insistently be ourselves at whatever cost.

Soul Survivor May 17, 2013

Posted by The Typist in New Orleans, Toulouse Street.
Tags:
add a comment

his-holiness-the-xiv-dalai-lama_lToday, whether you are listening to the Dali Lama or watching a live stream or you can’t or won’t or think you could care less, are a professed atheist, as a New Orleanian, as a citizen of a troubled country embroiled in killing fields at home and abroad, you must read Rodger Kamenetz amazing talk given at Temple Sinai in New Orleans on May 9, 2013.

The Crows Come Home May 16, 2013

Posted by The Typist in Crow, cryptical envelopment, Fortin Street, Toulouse Street.
add a comment

Crow

The crowds are long gone, and the end of the noisy disassembly of the tents is almost done. The neighborhood crows who roost somewhere back around Maurepas Street, are once again calling in the morning although I have not spotted one yet. You would think the garbage feast of Jazz Fest would be a prime time of year for the Fortin Street crows but every year they leave for some spot unknown. Perhaps it was not just the distraction and exhaustion of living across from carnival for two weeks but also their absence which has kept me from writing much, here or elsewhere.

Welcome home, brothers. I have stories for you.

“13 Crows”

13.
Black sinner that I am,
lay me out
naked as I came.
Let them feed
& I’ll       fly away
laughing.

Odd Words May 16, 2013

Posted by The Typist in books, literature, New Orleans, Odd Words, Poetry, Toulouse Street.
add a comment

& Gambit newspaper is hosting an Adult Spelling Bee Thursday May 16 at 7 p.m. at The Rusty Nail, hosted by Gus Kattengul, Gambit sports writer. $5 cover and 20% of the bar take will go to the winning charities. (Go Team English from UNO!).

& 17 Poets! features three readers this evening at 8 p.m.: Mel Coyle, Quo Vadis Breaux, and Asali DeVan followed by the open mic. Gold Mine Saloon, 701 Dauphine St. Coyle is from Chicago and other places where the corn grows. She co-edits the journal TENDE RLOIN and curates ColdCuts, a fabulous reading series in New Orleans. Some say she looks like an elf. The chapbook OPERA TRANS OPERA written with Jenn Marie Nunes is now available through aliceblue. Breaux has published poetry, essays and creative non-fiction in a number of anthologies. She is the Executive Director of the Center for Ethical Living and Social Justice Renewal where she works with volunteers dedicated to recovering New Orleans. She and her husband live in New Orleans. They have four sons. Ecclesiastes is a mother, wife, daughter, educator, event producer, spoken word artist, and community servant. She has presented her brand of “activist poetry” on stages and in classrooms across the country, and is a highly sought speaker on community development issues. In addition to authoring the Essence Empowerment Seminars, she coordinates the Congo Square African Marketplace, has taught spoken word, social justice, and service learning at Tulane University, and co-founded the Akoben Words-In-Action Festival and is Executive Producer of the Tremé 200 Festival.

& Also on Thursday evening at 5:30 p.m. Garden District Book Shop features Jill McCorkle’s new novel Life After Life. McCorkle’s first novel in seventeen years is alive with the daily triumphs and challenges of the residents and staff of Pine Haven Estates, a retirement facility now home to a good many of Fulton, North Carolina’s older citizens.

& Tonight at the East Jefferson Parish Regional Library, author night hosts N. S. Patrick’s <em<The Mysteries of Jack the Ripper. Patrick is a native of Michigan’s Upper Peninsula. He attended Albion College and obtained a BA in Business Administration. He served as an officer in the U. S. Navy from 1962 to 1969. He lives in Kenner, Louisiana.

& On Friday, May 17 Garden District presents Nell Dickerson’s Porch Dogs, with the LSPCA with adoptable dogs and a Doggy Kissing Booth. Porch Dogs combines fine-art portraits of man’s best friend with beautiful architectural documentation of the Southern porch. Dickerson fondly recalls childhood nights on the sleeping porch of her grandparents’ Mississippi Delta home the sounds of katydids, cicadas, and tree frogs, the merciful breeze from the overhead fan. But during the heat of the day, the family sought refuge indoors, leaving the dog to his lonely vigil. “I felt like he understood that the porch was the gateway between inside and outside and that it was his duty to keep sentry there in case someone wanted to pass,” she recalls.

& McKoewn’s Books and Difficult Music hosts An Evening of Art and Emerging Writers Saturday hosted by Thaddeus Conti and featuring Jamie Chiarello, Caroline Rash, Adam O’Connor, Jacob Dilson, Kerry Leigh and Jonathan Milan Walters. Drawings by Thaddeus Conti will be displayed in the manner of Tibetan prayer flags. 7 p.m.

& On Saturday Maple Street Book Shop Uptown hosts Science fiction writer Brandon Sanderson, author of A Memory of Light, the final book in Robert Jordan’s The Wheel of Time series, will be signing (and numbering) his new young adult novel, The Rithmatist, on May 18th from 1 ‘til 3pm at our Uptown shop. The first 50 people in attendance will receive a Rithmatist bag complete with chalk and instructions for making Rithmatist chalkings!

& Celebrate Children’s Book Week with Octavia Books Saturday, May 18 at 11 a.m. when artist/author Alex Beard comes to tell stories from and sign his three wonderful books, CROCODILE’S TEARS, MONKEY SEE, MONKEY DRAW, and THE JUNGLE GRAPEVINE. CROCODILE’S TEARS tells the story of a rhino and a tickbird and the endangered animals they encounter on a journey to discover why crocodile is crying. This funny and cautionary tale has been heralded by Kirkus Review as, “…ecological storytelling at it’s finest!” MONKEY SEE, MONKEY DRAW tells the story of a troop of monkeys and an elephant who learn to paint and draw with their hands and feet in a tale about confronting fears and the discovery of creative expression. THE JUNGLE GRAPEVINE tells the story of eight African animals who learn about the dangers of rumors through an outrageous game of telephone. Octavia Books has been selected as an official event host site for the 94th annual celebration of Children’s Book Week, May 13-19 in 2013! The longest-running national literacy initiative, Children’s Book Week is celebrated yearly in schools, libraries, bookstores, and homes across the country.

& On Saturday the Old Metairie Branch of the Jefferson Parish Library hosts the Greater New Orleans Chapter of LA Poetry Society for a reading workshop from 2-4 p.m. in the meeting room

& Sunday May 19th at 2 p.m. Garden District Book Shops features Peggy Frankland with Susan Tucker and their book Women Pioneers of Louisiana Environmental Movement. This book provides a window into the passion and significance of thirty-eight committed individuals who led a grassroots movement in a socially conservative state. The book is comprised of oral history narratives in which women activists share their motivation, struggles, accomplishments, and hard-won wisdom. Additionally interviews with eight men, all leaders who worked with or against the women, provide more insight into this rich–and also gendered–history.

& Sunday at 8 p.m. at the Collumns Hotel Chris Champagne, author of The Yat Dictionary and a poetic and comedic satirist par excellence hosts his Ray Nagin Going Away Party. ” $15-info 504 330 9117

& The MelaNated Writers Collective hosts the last in their series of Sunday Shorts readings featuring MWC’s Danielle Gilyot and Pdeauxdungue Writers group’s Tad Bartlett. 8 p.m. at the Red Star Gallery on Bayou Road.

& The new Sunday show from Spoken Word New Orleans is Poetry and Paint Brushes. Spoken Word artists perform as a resident artists paints the crowd and performers. At 6 p.m. at Special Tea, 4337 Banks Street. No longer at the Bayou Road location.

& On the second, fourth, and fifth Sunday of each month, Jenna Mae hosts poets and spoken-word readers at 8:00 p.m. at the Fair Grinds Coffee House on 3133 Ponce de Leon St.

& Monday evening the East Bank Regional Library in Metairie hosts The Fiction Writers’ Group with featured guest author Tony Fennelly. This is a support group for serious writers of fiction. We do not focus on poetry, essays or nonfiction. Events consist of critique sessions from group members, author talks and writing exercises. Free of charge and open to the public. Registration is not required. 7-9 p.m.

& The New Orleans Haiku Society holds its monthly meeting at the Latter Memorial Library at 6 p.m.

& Susan Larson, the former book editor of the former Times-Picayune newspaper and member of the National Book Critics Circle hosts The Reading Life on WWNO (89.9 FM) on Tuesdays at 1:30 p.m. She features interviews with authors of local and national interest.

& At Cafe Istanbul poet, satirist and author of The Yat Dictionary Chris Champagne will unleash his poetical wit at 8 p.m., no cover but donations accepted. Satirical wit in poetry hasn’t been this much fun since Juvenal and Horace got in that nasty bar fight or, if you find that too obscured: If this were anywhere else than nominal democracy Champagne would be wasting away in a gulag where the leading cause of death would be hysterical laughter.

& Tuesday at Octavia Books at 6 p.m. Bill Loehfelm will be signing his newest novel, The Devil in Her Way, at our Healing Center shop at 6:30 p.m. When Maureen Coughlin first appeared in The Devil She Knows (2011), the New Orleans Times-Picayune called her “unforgettable” and “the character of the year.” Booklist named The Devil She Knows one of 2011’s ten best thrillers and declared Maureen “as compelling a character as this reviewer expects to see this year.” Now she’s back in Bill Loehfelm’s new thriller, The Devil in Her Way, and her life has changed in more ways than one: She’s starting over in New Orleans as a newly minted member of the police force.

& Every Tuesday at 6 p.m. the Barnes & Noble West Bank hosts Westbank Writers’ Group. Every is welcome, from novices to serious authors. Join us for inspiration, friendly critiques, or just to connect with other local writers.

& Starting this Tuesday the New Orleans Public Library Martin Luther King Branch hosts ReWrite: A Writing Workshop. ReWrite is a writing workshop led by Zuri McCormick for ages 18 and up. May 21, 11 a.m. – 1 p.m. Beginning in June, 1st Friday of each month, 2 – 4 p.m. and 3rd Tuesday of each month, 11 a.m. – 1 p.m.

& Also from NOPL on Tuesday, the Hubbell Branch in Algiers hosts an author night with Poppy Tooker discusses Mme. Begue’s Recipes of Old New Orleans Creole Cookery at 6 p.m.

& Also on Tuesday the East Jefferson Regional Library hosts an Author Talk! with Ed Branley, Legendary Locals of New Orleans. Branley is a prolific chronicler of historic New Orleans, with prior titles on the history of K&B Drugstore, D.H. Holmes and other New Orleans institutions.

& Wednesday there is a weekly poetry reading hosted at the Neutral Ground Coffee House at 9 p.m

Let It May 11, 2013

Posted by The Typist in cryptical envelopment, Dancing Bear, New Orleans, The Narrative, The Typist, Toulouse Street.
Tags: ,
1 comment so far

Having established a stable orbit and allowing for the radio delay from Saturn, we resume our old habit of Radio Free Toulouse Street.

Odd Words May 9, 2013

Posted by The Typist in books, Indie Book Shops, literature, New Orleans, novel, Odd Words, Poetry, publishing, Toulouse Street.
add a comment

Jimmy Ross CoverThis week’s featured event is the first public reading of Jimmy Ross’s long-awaited collection Say What! by Lavendar Ink Press. The komusō-locked Crazy Uncle of the New Orleans literary family, who can pull an amazing tale from behind your year like a miraculous piece of favorite candy, will appear at a salon hosted Wednesday, May 15 by poet-hostess Jenna Mae. Ross is a story teller par excelence, Hotei poet, actor, baby-sitter of poor poets’ children and long-standing host of the open mic at 17 Poets! Details of time and place below in the listings.

Tomorrow is the last day for New Orleans students to enter the Latter Memorial Library’s Bad Poetry Contest. Prizes for the best of the worst entries include gift cards to local book stores and a new journal to fill with good poetry. There will be a public reading featuring the winners Thursday, May 16th at 6PM at Latter Library (5120 St. Charles Avenue). Refreshments and snacks will be served!

& Tonight (Thursday, May 9) Garden District Books features Jean Morgan Meaux: In Pursuit of Alaska: An Anthology of Travelers’ Tales 1879-1909 at 5:30 p.m. This collection of Alaskan adventures begins with a newspaper article written by John Muir during his first visit to Alaska in 1879, when the sole U.S. government representative in all the territory’s 586,412 square miles was a lone customs official in Sitka. It closes with accounts of the gold rush and the 1909 Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition in Seattle. Jean Meaux has gathered a superb collection of articles and stories that captivated American readers when they were first published and that will continue to entertain us today. The authors range from Charles Hallock (the founder of Forest and Stream, a precursor of Field and Stream) to New York society woman Mary Hitchcock, who traveled with china, silver, and a 2,800 square foot tent. After explorer Henry Allen wore out his boots, he marched barefoot as he continued mapping the Tanana River, and Episcopal Archdeacon Hudson Stuck mushed by dog sled in Arctic winters across a territory encompassing 250,000 miles of the northern interior.

& Join Room 220 for a Happy Hour Salon featuring readings by three exciting and celebrated novelists—Rachel Kushner, Nathaniel Rich, and Zachary Lazar—from 6 – 9 p.m. on Thursday, May 9, at the Press Street HQ (3718 St. Claude Ave.). Kushner, who will be visiting from Los Angeles, and New Orleans-based Rich both have new novels out that have been greeted with great critical acclaim. Lazar, a Tulane professor and author, has recently finished a new novel, and we look forward to (hopefully) hearing an excerpt from it at the event. Maple Street Bookshop will be on hand with the authors’ books for sale.

& Rodger Kamenetz, author of The Jew in The Lotus, will give a talk “What I Learned About Judaism from the Dalai Lama” in honor of the Dalai Lama’s upcoming visit to New Orleans. Event at Temple Sinai Reform Congregation, 6227 Saint Charles Ave, is free and open to the public.

& Tonight 17 Poets! features Chris Champagne and Bryan Spitzfaden . Champagne is a satirical poet, comedian and the author of The YAT Dictionary.

Itsy_Bitsy_Spider& Octavia Books hosts a startling new version of the children’s classic The Itsy Bitsy Spider by renowned children’s picture book author and illustrator Rebecca Emberley. “Here is a gorgeous retelling by Rebecca and her Caldacott Medal- winning father, Ed Emberley, of the classic tale of a spider climbing up the water-spout. Using their unique collage artwork, the Emberleys’ vision breathes new life and brilliant color into this toddler favorite. This is not your grandmother’s spider!” No indeed it is not. If this were a Miyazaki file I would have that uneasy feeling when the spider on this cover first appeared even though its jeweled body suggested goodness.

& Saturday’s Story Time with Miss Maureen at Garden District Books Uptown will feature Harry the Dirty Dog by Gene Zion at 11:30 a.m.

& The Studio in the Woods will host its annual FORESTival featuring resident artists exhibitions and performance on Saturday from 11:00 am – 5:00 pm, 13401 Patterson Road (essentially the very end of the Algiers River Road). Artist presentations including: Sarah Quintana & Co. singing original compositions from The Delta Demitasse series Sunpie and the Louisiana Sunspots Choreographer Monique Moss will reprise Katrina Cranes Secondline with Nina Nichols‘ giant puppet and the Panorama Duo with Ben Schenck, clarinet, and Boyanna Trayanova, snare drum Adventures in clay with Jane Hill Triple B’s: Berhman Brass Band Tshirts designed by Pippin Frisbie-Calder and silkscreened live with Ben Fox-McCord from Press Street/Antenna Gallery Jewelry for sale by Georgette Fortino Art activities in the Kids’ Creative Corner Tours of the woods with botanist David Baker Food and drink for purchase Tours of the founders’ home with Joe & Lucianne Carmichael

& On Saturday Garden District Book Shop Hosts Jackson Galaxy’s Cat Daddy: What the World’s Most Incorrigible Cat Taught Me About Life, Love, and Coming Clean at 2 p.m. In this book, Galaxy tells the poignant story of his thirteen-year relationship with a petite gray-and-white short-haired cat named Benny, and gives singular advice for living with, caring for, and loving the feline in your home. When Benny arrived in his life, Galaxy was a down-and-out rock musician with not too much more going on than a part-time job at an animal shelter and a drug problem. Benny’s previous owner brought the cat to the shelter in a cardboard box to give him up. Benny had seen better days —- his pelvis had just been shattered by the wheels of a car — and his owner insisted he’d been “unbondable” from day one. Nothing could have been further from the truth. An inspiring account of two broken beings who fixed each other, Cat Daddy is laced throughout with Galaxy’s amazing “Cat Mojo” advice for understanding what cats need most from us humans in order to live happier, healthier lives.

& The Peauxdunque Writers Alliance continues its Sunday Shorts reading series, this week featuring Terri Stoor along with Jeri Hilt! Doors open at the Red Star Galerie (2513 Bayou Road) at 8 p.m., with readings starting at 8:30.

& The new Sunday show from Spoken Word New Orleans is Poetry and Paint Brushes. Spoken Word artists perform as a resident artists paints the crowd and performers. At 6 p.m. at Special Tea, 4337 Banks Street. No longer at the Bayou Road location.

& On the second, fourth, and fifth Sunday of each month, Jenna Mae hosts poets and spoken-word readers at 8:00 p.m. at the Fair Grinds Coffee House on 3133 Ponce de Leon St.

& Monday evening the East Bank Regional Library in Metairie hosts The Fiction Writers’ Group. This is a support group for serious writers of fiction. We do not focus on poetry, essays or nonfiction. Events consist of critique sessions from group members, author talks and writing exercises. Free of charge and open to the public. Registration is not required. 7-9 p.m.

& Susan Larson, the former book editor of the former Times-Picayune newspaper and member of the National Book Critics Circle hosts The Reading Life on WWNO (89.9 FM) on Tuesdays at 1:30 p.m. She features interviews with authors of local and national interest.

& Tuesday at Maple Street Book Shop at The Healing Center Bill Loehfelm will be signing his newest novel, The Devil in Her Way, at our Healing Center shop at 6:30 p.m. When Maureen Coughlin first appeared in The Devil She Knows (2011), the New Orleans Times-Picayune called her “unforgettable” and “the character of the year.” Booklist named The Devil She Knows one of 2011’s ten best thrillers and declared Maureen “as compelling a character as this reviewer expects to see this year.” Now she’s back in Bill Loehfelm’s new thriller, The Devil in Her Way, and her life has changed in more ways than one: She’s starting over in New Orleans as a newly minted member of the police force.

& Every Tuesday at 6 p.m. the Barnes & Noble West Bank hosts Westbank Writers’ Group. Every is welcome, from novices to serious authors. Join us for inspiration, friendly critiques, or just to connect with other local writers.

& Tuesday evening brings Don Paul’s Poetry Ball 5 at the Cafe Istanbul at 8 p.m., featuring Asam Devan Ecclesiastes, Asia Raniey, Daniel Remhold, and special guest Lee Grue, followed by an open mic.

& Garden District will feature the UNO Press edition of Black and White on the Rocks by Rick Barton, the Creative Writing Workshop’s beloved director at 5:30 p.m. Black and White on the Rocks is a captivating tale set in the charming architecture of New Orleans. Michael Barnett drives the turns of this novel through greed ruled corruption, racial prejudice, friendship, and convoluted schemes. Barton has wrapped this story of bribery and redemption within the warmth of a loving marriage, offering sweet reprieve when life reveals its troublesome secrets that boil for release.

Fredrick Barton is the author of the novels The El Cholo Feeling Passes, Courting Pandemonium, Rowing to Sweden, and A House Divided, which won the William Faulkner Prize in fiction.

& Wednesday, May 15 Jenna Mae will host a salon at 7:30 p.m. celebrating the release of Jimmy Ross’ new collection from Lavender Ink: Say What! (http://www.lavenderink.org/content/link-titles/161) The thin, dreadlocked Ross–story teller par excelence, komusō poet, actor, baby-sitter of poor poets’ children and long-standing host of the open mic at 17 Poets! is ter beloved Crazy Uncle of the New Orleans literary family, who can pull an amazing tale from behind your year like a miraculous piece of favorite candy. The evening will feature readings by Megan Burns, Desiree Dallagiacomo, and signing and reading by Jimmy Ross. Art by Jim Tascio and Ozone. Jimmy Ross’ famous baklava and other goodies. BYOB or by donation.

& On Wednesday the NOPL will present An Evening of Codes, Symbols, and Secrets. The #1 international bestselling author Dan Brown will be streamed live and shown at the Algiers Regional Branch at 6:30 p.m. as he speaks about his new novel Inferno plus a range of topics including science, religion, codes, book publishing, movie making, and a few surprise topics. This will be Dan Brown’s only public U.S. appearance. Streamed Live from Lincoln Center.

& Wednesday there is a weekly poetry reading hosted at the Neutral Ground Coffee House at 9 p.m

Next Thursday May 16 at 7 p.m. come support UNO’s Team English in Gambit Weekly’s Adult Spelling Contest at The Rusty Nail, hosted by Gus Kattengul, Gambit sports writer. Competing for student scholarships for the UNO English Department, MA Rich Goode will try and best 19 other spelling bee contestants. Prizes will not only go to the winner of the contest, but also to the speller who brings the most supporters, so it’s important that Team English turns out. Please feel free to invite your friends to this event! $5 cover and 20% of the bar take will go to the winning charities.

W.A.S.T.E May 8, 2013

Posted by The Typist in cryptical envelopment, New Orleans, The Narrative, The Odd, The Typist, Toulouse Street.
2 comments

trystero horn

P.I.P

Odd Words May 2, 2013

Posted by The Typist in books, literature, New Orleans, novel, Odd Words, Poetry, publishing, reading, signings, Toulouse Street.
2 comments

Singer and author Patti Smith’s book signing at the Jazz Fest Book Tent today is cancelled, changed to a one-hour signing appearance at Garden District Book Shop from 2-3 p.m. The notice from The New Orleans Gulf South Booksellers says the event prior to her appearance at the book tent prior to her performance at the festival today was “has been cancelled by Jazz Fest.” Calls to the Festival headquarters were routed to voicemail. Smith was originally scheduled to sign her book about her friendship with Robert Mapplethorpe Just Kids. If you see this before you get to the festival, please don’t complain to the volunteers who staff the book tent, which benefits children’s literacy programs.

Thankfully, with Jazz Fest going full swing and authors all at the Book Tent, this will be a short list. That means I get set up my Blues Tent-front stoop, fill the coffee mug and just start to watch the world go by.

& so onto the other listings…

Local romance author Farrah Rochon is giving away a Kindle to celebrate her birthday and the release of her newest book Delectable Desire. You just have to like her page through this link to enter.

& Here is the rest of Thursday’s line up at the Jazz Fest Book Tent: Ron Thibodeaux, 12-1PM, Uell or High Water: How Cajun Fortitude Withstood Hurricans Rita and Ike; John Swenson, 1-2PM, New Atlantis: Musicians Battle for the Survival of New Orleans; Ben Sandmel, 2-3PM, Ernie K-Doe; Lorin Gaudin, 3-4PM, New Orleans Chef’s Table; Jay Mazza, 5:30-6PM, Up Front and Center.

& Tonight 17 Poets! Literary & Performance Series presents an evening celebrating the works of artists, writers and poets from publications of Trembling Pillow Press; readings by poets John Sinclair, Lee Meitzen Grue, Valentine Pierce, Herbert Kearney, Geoff Munsterman, Bill Lavender, Dave Brinks et al @ Goldmine Saloon (701 Dauphine Street in the French Quarter) at 7:30p.m. Featured program followed directly by Open Mic hosted by Jimmy Ross. There is no way I could squeeze the vitae of this amazing line up into a single column and there is not separate post with all the details. Let’s just say this is a night not to be missed featuring the very best of New Orleans poetry.

& Octavia Books will host a children’s book event at 4:30 p.m. today featuring Tad Hills’ GOOSE NEEDS A HUG and HOW ROCKET LEARNED TO READ.

& Every Thursday the Norman Meyer Branch Library hosts a teen writing workshop led by teens upstairs in the teen area. Encouraging creative arts exploration through reading, engaging discussions, and group activities. Youth ages 12-17 are invited! Group limited to 15 participants. Call the Branch to reserve a space.

& Friday evening at 6:30 p.m. Octavia books presents an evening with Augusten Burroughs, #1 New York Times bestselling author of Running With Scissors, to present and sign THIS IS HOW, his groundbreaking book that explores how to survive what you think you can’t. I think this ought to launch some fascinating conversations with Katrina survivors.

& Here is the rest of the Jazz Fest Book Tent author line up:

On Friday: Chris Champagne, 12-1PM, Yat Dictionary; Cornell Landry, 1-2PM, The Adventures of a Mardi Gras Bead Dog; Bill Loehfelm, 3-4PM, Devil in Her Way.

On Saturday: Ken Foster, 1-2PM. I’m A Good Dog; Tom Piazza, 2-3PM, Southern Journey Of Alan Lomax; Keith Spera, 3-4PM, Groove Interrupted; Elianna Casa, 4-5PM, Cool Kids Cook; Diane de Las Casas, 5-6PM, The Little “Read” Hen.

On Sunday: Kevin Bozant, 1-2PM, Quaint Essential New Orleans; David Spielman, 2-3PM, When Not Performing; WWOZ, 4-5PM, That Sounds Good; Earl Hampton, 5-6PM, Streetcar Guide to New Orleans.

And then you can stop and buy a copy of Coloring Book for the Criminally Insane, A Howling in the Wires or Carry Me Home at the Fortin Street Stage, 3000 block of Fortin between the Sauvage and Mystery Street gates. All proceeds from these sales go toward help some folks start a new small press.

& The new Sunday show from Spoken Word New Orleans is Poetry and Paint Brushes. Spoken Word artists perform as a resident artists paints the crowd and performers. At 6 p.m. at Special Tea, 4337 Banks Street. No longer at the Bayou Road location.

& On the second, fourth, and fifth Sunday of each month, Jenna Mae hosts poets and spoken-word readers at 8:00 p.m. at the Fair Grinds Coffee House on 3133 Ponce de Leon St.

& Monday the Black Widows Salon at Crescent City Books welcomes Lawrence Powell and Rich Campanella. The Tulane historian and the geographer, both award winning, will be discussing their work and New Orleans. This is not a lecture but a salon in which attendees are invited to participate. 7-9 p.m. Seating is limited, so we suggest you email books@crescentcitybooks.com to reserve.

& Monday evening the East Bank Regional Library in Metairie hosts The Fiction Writers’ Group. This is a support group for serious writers of fiction. We do not focus on poetry, essays or nonfiction. Events consist of critique sessions from group members, author talks and writing exercises. Free of charge and open to the public. Registration is not required. 7-9 p.m.

& Susan Larson, the former book editor of the former Times-Picayune newspaper and member of the National Book Critics Circle hosts The Reading Life on WWNO (89.9 FM) on Tuesdays at 1:30 p.m. She features interviews with authors of local and national interest.

& Every Tuesday at 6 p.m. the Barnes & Noble West Bank hosts Westbank Writers’ Group. Every is welcome, from novices to serious authors. Join us for inspiration, friendly critiques, or just to connect with other local writers

& On Tuesday at 6:30 pm Octavia hosts a discussion and book signing with Wenonah Hauter featuring her provocative new book, FOODOPOLY: The Battle Over the Future of Food and Farming in America, an exposé of how agribusiness and food corporations are undermining a healthy food system—and how voting with your fork will not solve the problem.

& Wednesday there is a weekly poetry reading hosted at the Neutral Ground Coffee House at 9 p.m.

Th-th-th-that’s all folks. If I make it to Garden District I’ll let you know what the crowds are like and get a snap of Odd Words with Ms. Smith if it kills me.

At five in the afternoon May 1, 2013

Posted by The Typist in cryptical envelopment, The Narrative, The Typist, Toulouse Street.
Tags: ,
add a comment

Spectator: “He’s not coming.”
Toni: “What?”
Spectator: “The man. He’s not coming.”
— from the Godot episode of Treme

Yes it’s a Beckett sort of afternoon: the gray threat of rain, the interminable diesels idling across the street, my best chance of distraction a call from a lawyer. Where would the savor of happiness or pleasure be without their absence?