jump to navigation

Odd Words November 29, 2012

Posted by The Typist in books, literature, New Orleans, novel, Odd Words, Poetry, publishing, Toulouse Street.
add a comment

If I were pedaling any faster I’d leave contrails at elbows and feet. Somewhere in the gut where coffee is processed into output a mad Scotsman is screaming up at the brain that it can’t take much more of this. My email and instant message alert sound on the work laptop is a WWII electro-mechanical submarine klaxon and this is not a drill. I repeat, this is not a drill.

This will be an abbreviated and to the point Odd Words.

& Tonight, Nov. 29 at the Maple Street Bookstore Healing Center location on St. Claude Jon O’Dell will be signing his book, The Healing at 6:30 p.m.

& Also tonight at 6 p.m. at Maple Street’s flagship location Moira Crone will be reading from and discussing The Not Yet at our Uptown location, Thursday, November 29th at 6PM. She’ll be joined by Michael Allen Zell who will be reading from and signing his debut novel, Errata.

& Tonight at the Goldmine Saloon 17 Poets! features book signings and featured readings by poets CAROLYN HEMBREE and KRISTINA ROBINSON. 8 p.m., with sign-up for open mike to follow starting at 7:30 pm.

& Tonight at 9 p.m. the Allways Loungs hosts the Poetry Brothel. Come wearing your finest burlesque, Victorian, or steampunk ensemble and receive a token for a free reading. Your hosts will be the Maître d’, Francis Shadfly (Jordan Soyka), and Madam Scarlett O’Heresy (Kim Vodicka). Featured reading is Vincent Cellucci, editor of Lavender Ink’s FUCK https://wordpress.com/#!/settings/poems, music, burlesque, people on stilts and more.

& Friday, Nov. 30 and Saturday, Dec. 30 brings a Poetry Exchange Symposium organized by Andy Stallings and Zach Savich

Friday, Nov. 30

  • 10:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m: PXP Student Presentations (Tulane, Stone Auditorium, Woldenburg Art Center, Rm. 210)
  • 1:15 p.m. – 4:45 p.m: Panel Conversations (Tulane, Norman Mayer Hall, Rm. 200B)
  • 1:15-2:00: Publishing and Editing Contemporary Poetry — moderated by Zach Savich, featuring Nik De Dominic, Carolyn Hembree, Caryl Pagel, Dan Rosenberg, Mark Yakich
  • 2:15-3:00: Community Building in Poetry — moderated by Brad Richard, featuring Megan Burns, Kelly Harris, Daniel Khalastchi, Kiki Petrosino
  • 3:15-4:30: All-New Orleans Student Reading — featuring student poets from universities and high schools across the city
  • 6:00 p.m. – 7:30 p.m: Keynote Reading (Tulane, Robert C. Cudd Hall) — featuring Daniel Khalastchi, Blueberry Morningsnow, Kiki Petrosino, Michelle Taransky

Saturday, Dec. 1

  • 12:00 p.m: Poetry Walk & Picnic — b.y.o. food and poetry (City Park, near intersection of Wisner Blvd. & Filmore Ave., at kiosk across from driving range)
  • 3:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m: Hunter Deely Memorial Poetry Reading — (Mid-City, 623 N. Rendon St.) — featuring Megan Burns, Peter Cooley, Nik De Dominic, Melissa Dickey, Carolyn Hembree, Maggie Jackson, Paul Killebrew, Ben Kopel, Alicia Rebecca Myers, Caryl Pagel, Hilary Plum, Brad Richard, Dan Rosenberg, Mark Yakich, and Zach Savich
  • 8:00 p.m: Closing Celebration — (Marigny/St. Claude, 2433 St. Claude Ave., at Music St.) — entrance on Music St., b.y.o.b.

& Saturday, Dec. 1 at 10 a.m. Octavia Books hosts a pajama party celebrating the 50th anniversary of Dr. Suess’s Sleep Book. Recommended ages 4-7.

& Maple Street Books will host Quattlebaum as the Book Buccaneer for Pirate vs. Pirate: The Terrific Tale of a Big, Blustery Maritime Match, followed by snacks and then another story: The Hungry Ghost of Rue Orleans Saturday at 11:30 a.m.

& Also on Saturday is the monthly Poetry Buffet at the Milton Latter Memorial Library hosted by Gina Ferrara. 2 p.m. Featuring Jarvis DeBerry, Gina Ferrara, and Lee Gru.

& Ken Foster brings his book on the misunderstood pit bull I’m A Good Dog to Garden District Books on Saturday at 3 p.m.

& Sunday, Dec. 2 brings Join the MelaNated Writers Collective for an afternoon of verse featuring the award-winning artist Thomas Sayers Ellis on Sunday, December 2 from 3 to 5 p.m. at Cafe Treme (1501 St. Philip St.)

& Also on Sunday Staple Goods Gallery, 1340 St. Roch Ave. will feature a reading with Micheal Zell, Niyi Osundare, Carroll Beauvais, Geoff Munsterman, Nasimiyu, and Maurice Ruffin at 2 p.m.

& Sunday afternoon also features a Chess Simultaneous Exhibition and Book Signing with International Chess Master Marc Esserman, author of Mayhem in the Morra! at the Maple Street Healing Center location. The booksigning is to follow exhibition play. Admission to the event is free. If you’d like to play in the simultaneous exhibition match, the price is $20.00 for adults and $10.00 for students

& On Sunday evening at 7 p.m. Spoken Word New Orleans presents Speak Easy Sundays Poetry at the Club Caribbean 2441 Bayou Road. Cover. Visit their website for updates on other spoken word events and visiting artists all around town.

& This month’s Black Widow Salon at Crescent City Books features poet Dave Brinks Monday, Dec. 3. Brinks will discuss his new book “The Secret Brain,” as well as many other subjects. 7 p.m.

&Also on Monday at 5 p.m. Garden District Books features Christopher Buehlman’s Between Two Fires, the story of a disgraced knight and a young girl orphaned by the Black Plague who unite to fight the demonic forces behind the dread disease.

& Also, every Monday at 9 p.m. on the amphitheater steps on Decatur Street across from Jackson Square it’s the outdoor open mic Writer’s Block. No rule, no mic, no rules, just right. Bringing cookies is an excellent introduction, and stay for the weekly finale, a rousing sing-a-long of Mercedes-Benz led by organizer Kate Smash.

& Susan Larson, the former book editor of the former Times-Picayune newspaper and member of the National Book Critics Circle hosts The Reading Life on WWNO (89.9 FM) on Tuesdays at 1:30 p.m. She features interviews with authors of local and national interest.

& On Tuesday, Dec. 4 the Maple Street Book Shop First Tuesday Book Club will be meeting at 5:45pm at the Uptown location to discuss The Marriage Plot by Jeffrey Eugenides.

& Tuesday evening brings Benjamin Morris to the 1718 Society, a student-run literary organization of Tulane, Loyola, and UNO students, continues their reading series, meeting the first Tuesday of every month at the Columns Hotel on St. Charles Avenue. Readings start at 7 p.m.. Open to the public, they provide an opportunity to experience writers (primarily local poets, but also fiction writers both local and national), while giving students a forum to present their own work to their peers and the community

&Kit Wohl’s New Orleans Classic Cocktails is featured Tuesday at 5 p.m. at Garden District Books. In this brilliantly photographed book, Kit Wohlhas compiled more than sixty luscious beverage recipes, both traditional and eccentric, from the city’s legendary and quirky establishments. Sadly, no samples are promised.

& Wednesday, Oct. 5 Octavia Books hosts a discussion and booksigning with historian Christopher R. Browning featuring his book, ORDINARY MEN, originally published in 1992. ORDINARY MEN is the story of a German reserve police unit made up of men neither committed Nazis responsible for the deaths of 83,000 Jews in Poland.

Wow, that’s a cheerful note to end on. Makes all those work deliverables, school papers and finals just vanish into the Black Nothingness hovering just a few feet away from my desk. Fortunately, I can make my way to the coffee blindfolded. Just remember that the light at the end of the tunnel may be a train, keep your towel handy and Don’t Panic.

It’s Time I Had Some Time Alone November 29, 2012

Posted by The Typist in cryptic envelopment, Toulouse Street.
add a comment

LIFE CENTER, TRANSDELIRIA SIX SIX SIX IS DECLARING AN EMERGENCY AND REQUESTS A VECTOR TO THE NEAREST BAR.

Falling November 27, 2012

Posted by The Typist in A Fiction, cryptic envelopment, Memory, New Orelans, The Narrative, The Typist, Toulouse Street.
Tags:
add a comment

It was not the burr oak across the street, the only tree I know of that reliably turns gold and red come November. It was not the ridiculously sumptuous Thanksgiving dinner, or sitting with my oldest friend the next evening on a screened porch feeling the shift in the wind that brought the first real cold snap. It was the sight of them, squirrelly in the first cool afternoon, each knot of Catholic plaid or khakis energetic as particles of a textbook atom but drifting home as slow as dust motes. Those are the days cemented in memory as the first of Fall, the irresistible urge to be outside in the cool air, an hour to cover the dozen blocks home, goofing and never breaking a sweat, the blanket of summer lifted and the holidays ahead not quite a conscious thought but somehow simply present like the warming patches of afternoon sun between the trees.

Odd Words November 23, 2012

Posted by The Typist in books, literature, New Orleans, Odd Words, Poetry, publishing, reading, Toulouse Street.
add a comment

It’s Black Friday and so far there are no reports of tramplings, stabbings or arrests at your local independent bookstores so if you are ready to start your Christmas shopping why not go somewhere safe? If you feel you must venture into Barnes & Noble today (but why, really?) just remember no one made you drive down Veterans Highway today. Have Fun Storming the Castle.

& On Saturday, Nov. 24 author Michael Tisserand signs My Bookstore: Writers Celebrate Their Favorite Places to Browse, Read, and Shop. In My Bookstore, you’ll read some of our greatest authors’ stories about the pleasure, guidance, and support that their favorite bookstores and booksellers have given them over the years.

Starting Saturday: To say Thanks for Shopping Indie Octavia Books is offering in-store shopping bonuses on an impressive array of 66 favorite independent bookstore titles selected from the 2012 Indie Next picks – inspired recommendations from independent bookstore booksellers everywhere. We’ll be highlighting this thoughtful collection of independent bookstore favorites beginning on Small Business Saturday and running through the following Saturday, Dec. 1.

& Also on Saturday, Todd-Michael St. Pierre will be signing his cookbook, Taste of Treme, Saturday at 12 non at Maple Street Book Shops Healing Center location. He’ll also be signing at the Uptown store at 6 p.m..

& Ken Foster will be signing his book, I’m A Good Dog, at Maple Street Book Shop’s Uptown location at 1 p.m. Filled with inspiring stories and photographs, this heartfelt tribute to the pit bull celebrates one of America’s most popular yet misunderstood dogs.

& Every Saturday at Maple Street Book Shop Uptown its Story Time with Miss Maureen. This week: Black Dog by Levi Pinfold. Kids wil make paper snowflakes and drink hot chocolate.

& There will be no reading at the Maple Leaf Bar Reading Series this Sunday due to collision with the Saint’s game in the front bar. The following Sunday Nov. 2 John Gery’s UNO MFA Poets will present a group reading. If you’ve ever watched a game at the Maple Leaf you will recall that their state-of-the-art sound system creates the only place on earth louder than the inside of the Superdome.

& On Sunday evening at 7 p.m. Spoken Word New Orleans presents Speak Easy Sundays Poetry at the Club Caribbean 2441 Bayou Road. Cover. Visit their website for updates on other spoken word events and visiting artists all around town.

& On Monday, Nov. Alex Hitz presents My Beverly Hills Kitchen: Classic Southern Cooking With a French Twist at Garden District Book Shop at 6 p.m. n this cookbook of more than 175 recipes, Alex Hitz blends the home cooking of his mother’s Atlanta kitchen with lessons he learned in France to come up with food anyone can cook and we all want to eat.

& Also, every Monday at 9 p.m. on the amphitheater steps on Decatur Street across from Jackson Square it’s the outdoor open mic Writer’s Block. No rule, no mic, no rules, just right. Bringing cookies is an excellent introduction, and stay for the weekly finale, a rousing sing-a-long of Mercedes-Benz led by organizer Kate Smash.

& Maple Street Book Shop’s the Lunch ‘n’ Lit group will be meets this Tuesday at the Keller Library Community Center Loft at 12 p.m. (and every fourth Tuesday). November’s meeting will be a discussion of Gillian Flynn’s Gone Girl. Participants should bring their lunch. Newcomers are welcome!

& Susan Larson, the former book editor of the former Times-Picayune newspaper and member of the National Book Critics Circle hosts The Reading Life on WWNO (89.9 FM) on Tuesdays at 1:30 p.m. She features interviews with authors of local and national interest.

Tuesday evening Garden District Book Shops hosts Donald Palmisano and The Little Red Book of Leadership Lessons. Dr. Donald J. Palmisano explores the vital qualities that every American should look for in a leader by gleaning lessons from great figures throughout history. Foreword by Louisiana Governor Bobby Jindal. To avoid a Tourette’s-like outburst resulting in a possible exorcism intervention by our Dear Leader, Odd Words will refrain from comment on the selection of the foreword author or the choice of “Little Red Book” for the title except to note that the latter explains a lot of things about our current political climate.

& On Wednesday, Nov. 28 Octavia Books hosts a book signing with writer Timothy Jay Smith featuring his new novel, Cooper’s Promise, a thriller set against the backdrop of civil war plagued Africa. Army sharpshooter and deserter Cooper Chance is trapped. Recruited from Iraq to fight in an African country ravaged by a chronic civil war, Cooper wants nothing more than to go home. Unfortunately, the only thing awaiting him in America is jail

So long, and thanks for all the fish November 22, 2012

Posted by The Typist in Fortin Street, New Orleans, The Narrative, The Typist, Toulouse Street.
Tags: ,
5 comments

It is too easy to slur Columbus Day and ignore Thanksgiving, for fear of upsetting the neighbors. Today we sit down to celebrate the complete incompetence of European settlers to feed themselves and contemplate the gratitude they showed to their Native neighbors, to offer our thanks to their omnipotently paranoid god who blessed the casual erasure of humans and bison from sea to shining sea, to engorge ourselves on indigenous corn and potatoes and African yams without a thought to their origins, eat thick slices from the engineered breast of a native bird bred like Chevrolets in a feed house it could not survive without constant dosing with antibiotics.

There is nothing America cannot conquer, master and seek to improve if it but sets its collective mind to it. All that is needed is a willing bit of trickery over those less blessed than us and there goes the neighborhood.

Let’s just fess up and admit our model of a republic is Roman not Greek, that we are setting out to a gourmand’s banquet at which we will eat until we are barely able to bend forward and reach the bottle to pour yet another glass of wine. I am Orleanian to the bone and have no problem with this. The gods of my hearth are not cosmic, are small and indigenous to this place and take great pleasure in our banquet. They are the absent ancestors whose places we have taken at the table. I will give thanks not to a remote god but to the stooped-back women who picked the cranberries and the men who wielded the power knives of the slaughter house. I will wish them joy of their possibly-distant families, camaraderie over food as best they can manage, and a day of rest.

Free Radicals November 16, 2012

Posted by The Typist in A Fiction, cryptic envelopment, Fortin Street, The Narrative, The Typist, Toulouse Street.
Tags:
add a comment

The Writer: “Why piece together the tatters of your life – the vague memories, the faces… the people you never knew how to love?”

Odd Words November 15, 2012

Posted by The Typist in books, literature, New Orleans, Odd Words, Poetry, publishing, Toulouse Street.
add a comment

This weekend is the annual NOLA Bookfair with a full day of readings and over 50 book and other vendors, relocated to 725 Magazine St. in the CBD. The location is across from the Farmers Market at Magazine & Girod. It’s sad our once culturally minded mayor has chased this event off Frenchman Street but that’s the way he rolls. Come out and support your local authors and small presses, which are going to be well-represented if you check the vendor list. You can get all the details on the NOLA Bookfair website.

It is so Odd that shortly after I published my idea for a 40 Over 40 list of regional writers who first published later in life, a friend should stumble across Bloom, a website dedicated to that very idea. I am still soliciting nominations for regional writers, with New Orleans as the center, who first published in hard copy after age 40. It can be a first publication, or a first book-length publication of someone published in journals before that age. Send them to odd.words.nola@gmail.com.

Due to issues with their online payment system, The Tennessee Williams Festival Fiction Contest has extended its deadline to Monday, Nov. 19 so it’s not too late to get your Great American Short Story in front of the judges.

& so to the listings…

& Tonight, Nov. 15 17 Poets! Literary & Performance Series presents featured readings with poets Deborah POE, Matvei YANKELVICH and Clare MARTIN. The features will be followed by OPEN MIC hosted by Jimmy Ross (Sign-up for Open Mic begins at 7:30pm, limit 14 readers). Poe is the author of the poetry collections the last will be stone, too, Elements (Stockport Flats), and Our Parenthetical Ontology (CustomWords), as well as a novella in verse, Hélène (Furniture Press). In addition, Deborah is co-editor of BetweenWorlds: An Anthology of Fiction and Criticism (Peter Lang). She is also co-editing a collection of Hudson Valley innovative poetry provisionally titled In/Filtration (Station Hill Press). Yanklevich is the author of the poetry collection Alpha Donut (United Artists Books) and the novella-in-fragments Boris by the Sea (Octopus Books), and several chapbooks. His translations of Daniil Kharms were collected in Today I Wrote Nothing: The Selected Writings of Daniil Kharms (Overlook/Ardis). He edits the Eastern European Poets Series at Ugly Duckling Presse. Martin is a graduate of the University of Louisiana at Lafayette and lifelong Louisiana resident. Her poetry has appeared in numerous literary journals and anthologies.

& The University of New Orleans Women’s Center will host Is That You on the Cover?, a conversation with Carolyn Hembree about her first book, Skinny; the publisher, Kore Press; and resources for women writers Thursday, Nov. 15, at 12:30 pm in Liberal Arts Building 197.

& Also on Thursday Maple Street Book Shop’s Bayou St. John location hosts Suzanne Johnson, author of a new urban fantasy series, who will be reading from and signing her latest book, River Road, at 6 m. Johnson , a longtime New Orleans resident now living in Auburn, Alabama, is a veteran journalist with more than fifty national awards in writing and editing nonfiction. She is a graduate of the University of Alabama, and a native of Winfield, Alabama. River Road is the follow-up to Suzanne’s first title, Royal Street, both of which are put out by Tor, and will be available at the signing.

& Garden District Book Shop features Will Schwalbe’s The End of Your Life Book Club, at 5:30 p.m. Thursday. “This is the inspiring true story of a son and his mother, who start a “book club” that brings them together as her life comes to a close. Over the next two years, Will and Mary Anne carry on conversations that are both wide-ranging and deeply personal, prompted by an eclectic array of books and a shared passion for reading.”

& This Friday, Nov. 16 at 5:30 p.m. Octavia Books, along with Tales of the Cocktail and Old New Orleans Rum, to celebrate the release of Kit Wohl’s beautiful new book, NEW ORLEANS CLASSIC COCKTAILS: Spirited Recipes. Kit will present and sign copies. And, there will be some refreshing sips too. Since it’s a Friday afternoon, the event is starting a half hour earlier than the usual time. Wohl is a writer, photographer, graphics designer and artist. Following completion Arnaud’s Restaurant Cookbook in 2005, she designed, photographed, researched and wrote the first five volumes of her New Orleans Classic restaurant series, each covering a different aspect of the city’s traditional and mainstream cuisines.

& Friday night at Maple Street Book Shop’s Bayou St. John location The Diane Tapes reading series continues with Maia Elgin, Elizabeth Gross and Jenn Marie Nunes at 6 p.m.

& This Saturday the Octavia Book Club meets to discuss The Octavia Book Club Adam Johnson’s The Orphan Master’s Son at 10:30 am. The club meets every third Saturday.

& Every Saturday at 11:30 a.m. it is Story Time with Miss Maureen at the Maple Leaf Bookshop, with a new children’s book, crafts and more. Details on Maple Streets

& On Saturday, Nov. 17 at Garden District Book Shop and again Monday, Nov. 19 at Maple Street Books Uptown location Debra Shriver will be signing her book, In the Spirit of New Orleans Monday, November 19th, at 6PM at our Uptown store. Please join us for a wine and cheese reception to welcome her. The perfect holiday gift for any New Orleanian, this celebratory volume shares what makes the Crescent City so special from its fascinating history and rich musical legacy to its enduring traditions and cultural landmarks. Includes an insider’s list featuring bars for the cocktail connoisseur, venues for the music maven, and can’t-miss restaurants for the gourmand.

& On Sunday evening at 7 p.m. Spoken Word New Orleans presents Speak Easy Sundays Poetry at the Club Caribbean 2441 Bayou Road. Cover. Visit their website for updates on other spoken words and visiting artists all around town.

& The monthly meeting of the New Orleans Haiku Society will be Monday, Nov 19 at 6 p.m. at the Latter Memorial Library.

& Also, every Monday at 9 p.m. on the amphitheater steps on Decatur Street across from Jackson Square it’s the outdoor open mic Writer’s Block. No rule, no mic, no rules, just right. Bringing cookies is an excellent introduction, and stay for the weekly finale, a rousing sing-a-long of Mercedes-Benz led by organizer Kate Smash.

& Susan Larson, the former book editor of the former Times-Picayune newspaper and member of the National Book Critics Circle hosts The Reading Life on WWNO (89.9 FM) on Tuesdays at 1:30 p.m. repeating Sundays at Noon. She features interviews with authors of local and national interest.

& Tuesday, Nov. 20 at Garden District Book Shop Shelby Tucker will sign his book Client Service, the story of the IOS (Investors Overseas Services) swindle in the 1960s. Tucker was an investor and an insider who worked as a salesman for IOS in its early days.

Come On Rise Up November 12, 2012

Posted by The Typist in Bloggers, Federal Flood, hurricane, Hurricane Katrina, New Orleans, Recovery, Toulouse Street, We Are Not OK.
Tags: , , , , ,
1 comment so far

My friend Sam Jasper’s post over at New Orleans Slate Unsolicited Advice to the Northeast in the Aftermath has gone viral in the Northeast. There are now 70 comments and dozens more private emails. Less than 1% of people who actually read a blog post (discounting those who drop in and leave) every leave a comment. You need to go read this wherever you are.

She starts off with a Bruce Springsteen Song Jersey Girl. The Springsteen song I can’t get out of my head is the one the NBC nightly news ran at the end of one of their broadcasts over a montage of the ruins of Sandy, the same song he sang to tens of thousands reduced to sobbing at Jazz Fest 2006: My City of Ruins.

When I could bring myself to watch the news the force fields went up. It is as if you have just had a minor stroke. The brain is empty, the body seems distant and alien, and the television a nightmare half remembered.

I only cried when I heard that song.

Come on, rise up.

You can do it. Your boots are on the pile in front of the house so you will somehow have to manage to lift yourself up by sheer will, above every gospel word Sam has written in her post. Some folks in the affected areas may not fare to badly. The government starting running dump trucks of money into Manhattan after 9-11 to repair utilities and such. Maybe you’ll be lucky, and your utility bill won’t double. Maybe you have stronger elected officials, who won’t stand for a property-and-casualty insurance bill larger than the principle on your mortgage. I hope so.

Come on, rise up.

We felt so abandoned after the Federal Flood a deceased friend adopted the term Sinn Fein, not a reference to modern Irish politics but to the origins of the party but to the translation: Ourselves Alone.

Sinn Fein, baby. But you are not alone. The people of the hurricane coast, who have done all this before in 2005 and again and again before this, stand at your shoulders like the ghosts of every soldier buried in a foreign land. The people of the south are a prayerful people, and right now millions of hands are clasped, a hundred thousand Saints’ candles burning, uncounted joss sticks lit to the Merciful Ones. Trucks are loaded. Checks are written. If you finally figure out what we’ve known down here since Camille in ’69 the mayor of Staten Island has figured out, and you will to, but one way or another help will come. It will come not from the insurance racketeers. It will come unsought from church groups. It will come in trucks from points unknown filled with cleaning supplies. It will come with all I see that remains of the America we were taught, and it will not come from the government. It will come from you neighbors. It will come up from the coast from those who stayed, from those who returned, by the heavenly intervention of the ghosts of the flood.

It will come.

“I pray Lord
with these hands
for the strength Lord
with these hands
for the faith Lord
with these hands

Come on rise up!
Come on rise up!”

Rise up.

Odd Words Green Sheet Extra! November 9, 2012

Posted by The Typist in books, literature, New Orleans, Odd Words, Poetry, publishing, Toulouse Street.
add a comment

“If you finish too early, you’re doing it wrong.”
— unidenfitied character on Treme last week discussing, um, Indian suits. I think.

Just remember if you want to be in the list from the get-go on Thursday to get your listings into me by no later than Wednesday to odd.words.nola@gmail.com, Facebook, Twitter, snail mail, stuffing flyers into my hands or RFC1149.

& UPDATE: Also on Friday at 7 p.m., McKeown’s Books & Difficult Music hosts HOW the SKINNY VICTORY of BUTCHER’S SUGAR became SPITSHINE ERRATA, featuring authors Carolyn Hembree – Skinny; Ben Kopel – Victory; Brad Richard – Butcher’s Sugar’ Anne Marie Rooney – Spitshine; Geoff Wyss – How’ and, Michael Allen Zell – Errata.

& UPDATE:Also on Saturday, at 7 p.m. a new reading series at Kajun’s Pub, The Cold Cuts Series hosted by Tenderloin Magazine editors Mel Coyle and Jenn Nunes featuring Kim Vodicka, Vincent Cellucci, and Anne Marie Rooney.

& UPDATE:Join author Carolyn Morrow Long as she discusses her new release, Madame Lalaurie, Mistress of The Haunted House, at The Tennessee William’s Festival monthly Coffee and Conversation at 7 pm, Tuesday, Nov. 13 at the main branch Jefferson Parish Library. This session includes local author interviews, book signings of their latest releases, Q&A sessions, and complimentary French Market Coffee.

Come Home to New Orleans, Bob Kaufman November 9, 2012

Posted by The Typist in New Orleans, Odd Words, Poetry, Toulouse Street.
Tags:
2 comments

Reposting for the two kind European women who so wanted a copy:

Come home to New Orleans
Bob Kaufman
And hear Leah Chase
Sing Mahalia Jackson
In the synagogue of the oaks
As magnolias brown and fall.

Come home to New Orleans
Bob Kaufman
And see the old white south
Gathered at preservation hall
Where old Negro Bodhisattvas
Blow their Creole love songs.

Come home to New Orleans
Bob Kaufman
See the White Citizens Councils
Huddle in their Potemkin Americas
At the swampy back of town
In terror of their children’s radios.

Come home to New Orleans
Bob Kaufman
To see pale northern tourists
Hungry for that Black jazz
Wolf down bad okra gumbo
At Maspero’s slave exchange.

Come home to New Orleans
Bob Kaufman
To see Lorca’s sons openly
Embracing in the red carnations
Mirrored in the dark windows
Of the sad, historic cathedral.

Come home to New Orleans
Bob Kaufman
And the ghosts of Congo Square
Will second line behind
Your broken poet’s bones
With an African brass band

Come home to New Orleans
Bob Kaufman
And Indians from all wards
Will carry you on their shoulders
The length of Basin Street
And sing that Indian Red.

Come home to New Orleans
Bob Kaufman
& we will honor your fierce spirit
with votives, flowers & poundcake
among the ancien Creole poets,
Marie Laveau & Homer Plessy.

Come home to New Orleans
Bob Kaufman
And enter here, eternally
Into that crackling blueness
Of towering Gulf storms
Pouring out the ancient rain.

Odd Words November 8, 2012

Posted by The Typist in books, literature, New Orleans, Odd Words, Poetry, publishing, Toulouse Street.
Tags: , ,
add a comment

“I’m surprised there are so many men here!” MC Megan Haris remarked to no one in particular among the smokers outside poet and artist Jena Mae’s new apartment/art space on St. Roch. Among the 40-Odd audience were partners, poets and friends and if you are going to celebrate Strong Women, I think you definitely want men in attendance. Jimmy Ross’s baklava and Thaddeus Conti’s red beans were awesome offerings at the temple of Calliope. Readers included Roselyn Lionhart (that ROSElyn like the flower), and it was a room full of lionhearted performers: Heather Tammany, R.K. Powers, Lee Meitzen-Grue, Megan Burns, Sandra Grace Johnson and Laura McKnight. If you missed it, don’t despair entirely (just a little; you deserve it), because you can catch an equally wonderful lineup Friday, Nov. 9 at 8 p.m. for Poetry and Piano at Buffa’s Bar. Music by Lady Baby Miss, and readers include Jessica Ruby Radcliffe, Chyana Bwyse Gradley, Gerrul Robinson, Cate Root, Kim Vodicka, Gina Ferrara, lauren Marie, Melante Leavitt, Ayanna Monila-Mills, Kate Smash, Beverly Rainbolt, Kelly Johns, Sunday Shae Parker, Trisha Rezende and Elizabeth Garcia. Forget poetry slams. This will be distaff smackdown, so if you missed last night (OK, you can get away with regret instead of despair if you missed it), but don’t miss this one.

& Tonight’s Main Event is the New Orleans launch of 17 Poets! co-host and tribal shaman of NOLA poetry Dave Brinks’s The Secret Brain. It’s already debuted at City Lights Books in San Francisco with all of the luminaries of that scene in attendance, and in Parish. Tonight’s show will combine readings with musical and dance performances by Rockin’ DOPSIE,, Gaynielle NEVILLE, Reverend Goat CARSON, Katarina BOUDREAUX, and Matthew SHILLING, keeping alive the half-century old tradition of mixed media poetry performance for which the Goldmine Saloon location is world-famous. So come stop by the bar that helped birth the Beats for a public viewing of Brink’s Secret Brain.

& Just in time for Mayor-Of-An-Imaginary-Disney-New-Orleans Mitch Landrieu’s latest bonehead proposal to close the Jackson Square pedestrian mall at night comes Jackson Squared : The Heart of the Quarter, by Tom Varisco, John Biguenet, Will Crocker and Jackson Hill. Tom Varisco’s new book documents a year in the life of the French Quarter’s Jackson Square with lively, outrageous, humorous, and sometimes shocking pictures by himself and photographers Will Crocker and Jackson Hill and essays by John Biguenet, John Carr, Nicole Biguenet Pedersen and Susan Sarver. Standing in the square next to Ole Hickory, you’ll meet musicians, artists, tourists and oddballs of every stripe. The book is an irreverent celebration of the heart of the quarter and New Orleans. Thursday, Nov. 8 at 6 pm. Somebody by a copy for Mitch so he is reminded he doesn’t live in Baton Rouge anymore.

& On Friday, Nov. 10 at 5 pm Octavia Books hosts a YA event featuring Robin Bridges’ The Unfailing Light, the new installment in her young adult trilogy, The Katerina Trilogy, set in St. Petersburg, Russia, during the reign of Tsar Alexander III.The Katrina Trilogy. Note the early start time.

& Friday, Nov. 9 at 5:30 p.m. Garden District Book Shop features Summer Wood’s Raising Wrecker, “the story of this nearly-broken boy whose presence turns a motley group of isolated eccentrics into a real family. Real enough to make mistakes. Real enough to stick together in spite of everything ready to tear them apart. There’s no guidebook to mothering for Melody, who thought the best thing in life was eighty acres of old growth along the Mattole River and nobody telling her what to do – until this boy came along.”

& If you already forgot about Friday night’s Ladyfest reading, you probably forgot to take, um, that supplement that supposed to help with brain function and memory. The reading is 8 pm until Midnight at Buffa’s Lounge.

& UPDATE: Also on Friday, McKeown’s hosts HOW the SKINNY VICTORY of BUTCHER’S SUGAR became SPITSHINE ERRATA, featuring authors Carolyn Hembree – Skinny; Ben Kopel – Victory; Brad Richard – Butcher’s Sugar’ Anne Marie Rooney – Spitshine; Geoff Wyss – How’ and, Michael Allen Zell – Errata

& The New Orleans Public Library is hosting an Adult Poetry Workshop at the Martin Luther King Branch Library, 1611 Caffin Avenue, from 3-5 pm and every second Friday through March. The workshop is hosted by Delia Tomino Nakayama and funded by Poets & Writers.

&Saturday, Nov. 10 ta 1 pm Garden District presents Eleni Gage’s, Other Waters. “When the protagonist May’s grandmother dies in India, a family squabble over property ignites a curse that drifts across continents and threatens Maya’s life. She hopes a trip back to India with her best friend, Heidi, will enable her to remove the curse, save her family, and put her own life back in order. Thus begins a journey into Maya’s parallel worlds– New York and an India filled with loving and annoying relatives, vivid colors, and superstitious customs she doesn’t, and does, believe in. But her time in India isn’t just a visit “home” or a chance to explore the strengthening and suffocating bonds of family, it’s also the beginning of a cathartic quest toward forging one identity out of two cultures.”

& There won’t be Story Time with Miss Maureen at Maple Street Book Shop’s uptown location due the University Montessori School Book Fair will be taking place all day.

& UPDATE:Also on Saturday at 7 p.m. a new reading series at Kajun’s Pub, The Cold Cuts Series hosted by Tenderloin Magazine editors Mel Coyle and Jenn Nunes featuring Kim Vodicka, Vincent Cellucci, and Anne Marie Rooney.

& Sunday Nov. 9 at 6 p.m.Fair Grinds Coffee Shop will host a book release party for Don’t Leave Your Friends Behind. How do we create new, non-hierarchical structures of support and mutual aid and include all ages in the struggle for social justice? Don’t Leave Your Friends Behind is a collection of concrete tips, suggestions, and narratives on ways that non-parents can support parents, children, and caregivers in their communities, social movements, and collective processes.

& On Monday, Nov. 12 Octavia Books presents p Martha Fitgerald featuring her new book, The Courtship of Two Doctors: A 1930s Love Story of Letters, Hope & Healing. In 1937, medical students began a two-year correspondence across 1,100 miles, and their fancy turned to deep respect and abiding love. Alice Baker of New Orleans and Joe Holoubek of Omaha became Dr. Alice and Dr. Joe, a professional couple known for their unbreakable bond. The Courtship of Two Doctors chronicles their early history, providing an inspiring look at the birth of a marriage and a lifetime of service.

& Tuesday, Nov. 13 at 5:30 pm Garden District feature’s David Spielman’s and Fred Lyon’s When Not Performing: New Orleans Musicians, “revealing portraits of New Orleans performers provide a provocative and intimate glimpse into the musical pulse of the city. They are captured in locations of their own choosing, places that define and inspire them as individuals. Often elusive as smoke, once captured their images are both haunting and familiar.
David G. Spielman followed these talented artists through the neighborhoods, backstreets, and bars, using little more than a Leica camera. Printed as duotones, the emotional images speak without shouting. Fred Lyon listened to the performers and engaged them in conversation, drawing meaning and understanding from their often complex tales of hardship, triumph, and family. Their stories allow the viewer to connect with each specific portrait and location. Among those captured in image and word are Terence Blanchard, Harry Connick Sr., Jeremy Davenport, Fats Domino, Clarence “Frogman” Henry, Dr. John, Ellis Marsalis, Frank Minyard, Charmaine Neville, Albinas Prizgintas, Katey Red, Paul Sanchez, Irma Thomas, Allen Toussaint, and Johnny Vidacovich, along with many others.”

& Sunday at 3 p.m. at the Maple Leaf Bar Reading Series is an Open Mic, preceded and followed by the usual poets-and-alcohol frivolity. Interested readers should contact Nancy Harris about featuring at New Orleans’ longest-running poetry reading series, founded by Everette Maddox. Next scheduled feature is Dec. 2 with John Gery’s UNO MFA Poets.

& On Sunday evening at 7 p.m. Spoken Word New Orleans presents Speak Easy Sundays Poetry at the Club Caribbean 2441 Bayou Road. Cover. Visit their website for updates on other spoken words and visiting artists all around town.

& Susan Larson, the former book editor of the former Times-Picayune newspaper and member of the National Book Critics Circle hosts The Reading Life on WWNO (89.9 FM) every Tuesdays at 1:30 p.m. repeating Sundays at Noon. She features interviews with authors of local and national interest.

& UPDATE:Join author Carolyn Morrow Long as she discusses her new release, Madame Lalaurie, Mistress of The Haunted House, at The Tennessee William’s Festival monthly Coffee and Conversation at 7 pm, Tuesday, Nov. 13 at the main branch Jefferson Parish Library. This session includes local author interviews, book signings of their latest releases, Q&A sessions, and complimentary French Market Coffee.

& On Wednesday, Nov. 15 Octavia Books hosts B.A. Shapiro featuring her new — and now The New York Times bestselling — novel, The Art Forger. “A clever, twisty novel about art, authenticity, love, and betrayal. B. A. Shapiro knows about Degas, and she knows about art theft and forgery, and she also knows how to tell a gripping story.” —Tom Perrotta

If you’re feeling left out, it is probably because you didn’t send your event to odd.words.nola@gmail.com. Make sure you make the list!

40 Over 40 November 3, 2012

Posted by The Typist in Toulouse Street.
3 comments

I grow weary of contests and lists that highlight emerging young writers. I subscribe to Narrative and what tipped me over the edge was their relentless promotion of their 30 Under 30 contest (entry fees apply, natch). I started writing seriously, excluding journalism, in the middle of the last decade, and say my first poem published I think three, four years ago. I have friends who also began to write seriously in mid-life, and I wonder why no one pays any attention to this cohort of writers. Here is a sample list from an article in the New York Times of notable writers who achieved success or even started writing late in life. Proust started Remembrance of Things Past at 39. The essay, however, sticks up for the Under 30 or Under 40 bar.

Joseph Conrad didn’t become a major writer until his 40s (after long years at sea). Katherine Anne Porter was 40 when her first short-story collection was published. Virginia Woolf entered her prime in her 40s. Norman Rush’s first novel wasn’t published until he was in his 50s. Nor is it to say that brilliant young novelists don’t mature into greater ones. Henry James peaked at about 60. Roth reached an extraordinary phase in his 60s. The Bellow of “Herzog” (49) is a greater artist than the Bellow of “The Adventures of Augie March” (38), which itself introduced a wholly new aesthetic to the English-language novel. And the Don DeLillo of “Underworld” (60) far surpasses the DeLillo of “End Zone” (35).

I started late, and have a coterie of friends who did as well. None will ever be able to enter one of these contests and rocket to notoriety, prominent publication and review in the NYT in our youth, because youth is behind us all. I disagree with the essay’s assertion that “[n]ot every major fiction writer is a natural, but each begins with a storehouse of material and memories that often attenuate over time. Writers in their youth generally have more direct access to childhood, with its freshets of sensation and revelation. What comes later — technical refinement, command of the literary tradition, deeper understanding of the human condition — may yield different results but not always richer or more artful ones.” The deep store of memory changes character with time like cellared wine, and in the best cases the vintage is improved. If the muse, which like angels is more monstrous than most people imagine, comes late in life it is not blunted by age. It may be your grandfather’s spotted carbon steel knife, an edge rescued from an obscure drawer and honed by persistent whetting into surgical perfection.

I’m not the first to ask this question. Here’s an essay by Martha Southgate at The Millions, and another by Steve Almond at TheRumpus. I can’t find a list or contest anywhere, at least none that The Google (oh, all-knowing One) offers up.

So here is my suggestion. Odd Words is going to assemble a list of regional writers who began publishing after 40, or published their first book-length work after 40 if published before. It is open to nomination by anyone, including the writer. I just need a name, a first publication anywhere by genre (more than one entry OK if they work in multiple genres) or of a first book-length work, the title and publisher, and an email address of the author if you are nominating someone else. If all you know is the person you are nominating’s email address and a title, send it to me, and I will run down the rest. Publication is limited to hard copy. I prefer writers someone believed in enough to spend money and kill trees to get their work out. Genre fiction is fine. Self-published works are not. Given Odd Word’s New Orleans focus, I’m looking for nominees from Louisiana, Mississippi and SE Texas. Mobile would be OK. Hey, it’s my list so I get to make the rules and I’m making them flexible so if you know someone in Birmingham or Montgomery or Austin send them along and maybe they’ll make the list. If I can’t get to 40 in, perhaps it will become 30 over 40. The number 30 seems to have some mystical power over list editors, some finality like the old telegrapher’s 33 at the end of a newspaper writer’s story.

This is not a contest. The most I can promise is an effort to take this viral, and get the writer’s name out into the wider world. The selected nominees will be published alphabetically, and the number cut will be determined by submissions and proximity to New Orleans. I’m not equipped to judge a contest and rank people. I’m relying on the editors of presses small and large to have culled the list for me. It is not a contest but maybe it will be the start of a movement as accidental as Alice’s Restaurant Thanksgiving Day Massacre, spreading to other blogs and journals until somewhere, someday, a Big Dog will decide to jump on it and we’ll see the first lists black on white.

Send your nominations to odd.words.nola@gmail.com, with the word Nomination in the subject line. I have no idea how long it will take to amass this list, but there’s no time like the present to get started.

The Not-So-Black Death November 2, 2012

Posted by The Typist in Federal Flood, Fortin Street, Murder, New Orleans, NOLA, The Narrative, The Typist, Toulouse Street.
2 comments

I open the folder that spent the last seven years in the Toulouse Street shed, and you can smell the light dusting of black mold. I go through it page by page, toss a few on the scanner, and tuck the most precious into gallon zip lock bags but my sinuses are on fire. I imagine the almost microscopic spores settling into the carpet and couch. I should have done this in the kitchen but it’s too late now. I will have to vacuum the front within an inch of its life. I never gutted a house like Ray, never faced the decision of my friend Eric to lose the respirator because working in a Type III in August in New Orleans is a choice between strangulation quick or slow. I remember the workers back in ’06 in the convenience store, grabbing a large, milky coffee and a Mexican sweet roll to start the day, bandannas bandito-style around their necks, the only protection they would have against the gypsum dust and mold.

You gotta die of something I think as I step out onto my stoop for a cigarette. The air is laced with hydrocarbons from the upriver refineries and my coffee is brewed with water from the sewer of mid-America. The other night I saw a man I haven’t run into in a while whose daughter suffered from dangerous levels of lead when first tested, an educated man and wife living in a carefully renovated house, not your idea of a tenement with peeling yellow paint, children stuffing flakes in their curious mouths but in parts of this city the dirt is thick with lead and arsenic. Their daughter is fine now but how many other children are playing in a packed-dirt rental backyard right now?

You gotta die of something, and that fried oyster po-boy might kill you in ways your clucking doctor might not imagine as she renews your cholesterol medicine. R.I.P., Mr. Folse, the shrimp boat captain said on Facebook when I told her I would continue eating wild caught Louisiana seafood. The planes had been out that day, she said, spraying Corexit on the latest sheen from British Petroleum’s Deep Water Horizon wellhead. For now those initials stand for Reel In Po-Boys, and who can blame her for still fishing when I-10 is lined with smiling chefs telling us to Eat Louisiana Seafood? What happens to Corexit when you dump it into a deep fryer? Who knows? Nothing to see here. Move on. What do you say to people who came home to complete ruin that would deter them living here? What would keep the people suffering today in New York away from a steady diet of diesel exhaust, Jersey VOCs and stress? What would take the farmers off the land, the ones who wrestle 50-gallon drums of poison without which they couldn’t make the bank note? What could keep that shrimp boat captain off the water? Short of Chernobyl and soldiers loading people onto trucks, nothing.

You gotta die of something, and if I put down the cigarettes what other diabolical entertainment might my grandfather’s ghost reach up from his alcoholic’s grave to suggest? If I were forced to stop eating seafood you can put me on suicide watch right away. The water is as clean as the Sewerage & Water Board can manage, and wins taste tests, but I know from a local brewer that Dixie used its own purified well water because the city’s Ph was skewed because there are still antique lead pipes in the system. They just don’t know where. I once found a slug beneath my patio chair one New Year’s Day, the hole where it went through the webbing. So it goes. You pick your place and take your chances. You are more likely to be killed or seriously injured by a car while walking in New York City than you are to be shot in New Orleans. After the flooding from the second hurricane in two years to strike New York you start to ask the question you answered a thousand times yourself: why do people live there.?

I am not worried about how I die so much as where, and that is the one decision about death most of us get to make. I was born here in New Orleans in a hospital on Perdido Street. I will die here and invite anyone who wishes to dispute that point to join me. I want to die where my diet is a cheap and easy contributing factor, where a wake is an occasion to shame the Irish, where a band is more essential than a minister. No bouquets for me. Just bury me when the sweet autumn clematis are in bloom, on a cool October day with someone cooking with the windows open, and the sound of the band carrying to the next ward on the apple-crisp air. Just put a pack of smokes and my Zippo in the box to get me through the day.

Odd Words November 1, 2012

Posted by The Typist in Toulouse Street.
add a comment

“I was born to hustle roses down the avenues of the dead.”
— Charles Bukowski

It was a quiet Halloween, with two trick-or-treaters and my incredulous son trying to appreciate Bela Lugosi’s Dracula without lapsing into MST3K mode. He didn’t know who Bela Lugosi was so I thought he needed to see at least one movie, although I probably could have queued up Nosferatau with some Bauhaus in the background if I really wanted a gothic atmosphere. I went to bed and finished Matt Johnson’s fascinating Pym, which takes Edgar Allen Poe’s tale for a new, post-colonial spin. It’s a fascinating book and will get four stars on Goodreads but at the end I discovered that he is also the author of a couple of graphic novels including Dark Rain: A New Orleans Story. I just started a new to-read stack after the Louisiana Book Festival, I am one broke-ass mothasomethin and here I am figuring a trip to the comic store into my weekend. I think Johnson’s tale of two ex-cons who decide post-Katrina chaos is the perfect time to rob a bank belongs on my shelf next to Josh Neufeld’s After the Deluge.

See you at the cemetery.

& so to the listings….

& Thursday, Nov. 1 at Garden District Books Peggy Sweeney-McDonald is discussing and signing her book, Meanwhile at Cafe Du Monde: Life Stories About Food, with with special guests and contributors Nell Nolan, Drew Ramsey, Margarita Bergen, Janet Daley and special guest bartenders: Chris Hannah and Kimberly Patton-Bragg.These foodie monologues invoke your own special comfort foods, accompanied by candid photographs of the many people involved, from speakers to audience members, will be a treasure trove of delightful and delicious memories for all. Karen Benrud, a member of the Café Du Monde family of New Orleans, provides the foreword that celebrates the 150th anniversary of the landmark café and its history.

& Katherine Soniat will read from and sign her sixth collection of poetry, A Raft, A Boat, A Bridge, on this Thursday at 12:30 at the UNO Sandbar. This event is free and open to the public. A Raft, A Boat, A Bridge is recently out from Dream Horse Press. The Swing Girl, published by Louisiana State University Press, was selected as Best Collection of 2011 by the Poetry Council of North Carolina. A Shared Life won the Iowa Poetry Prize. Her work has appeared recently in Women’s Review of Books, Hotel Amerika, and Crazyhorse. She teaches in the Great Smokies Writers Program at UNC-Asheville.

& Thursday evening at 6 p.m. at Octavia Books also hosts Soniat. “Within the composure of Katherine Soniat’s phrasing in A Raft, A Boat, A Bridge something unsettled emerges and will not rest. She presents us with a richly conceived world ‘given to see through.’ But the seeing is rigorous. These poems are revelatory.” —Ron Slate

& Tonite, Nov. 1 17 Poets! features 17 Poets! Literary & Performance Series proudly presents featured readings with poets Tracey McTague plus a brief presentation by San Francisco / New Orleans poet Don Paul on his current cultural work in New Orleans through poetry. Our features will be followed by OPEN MIC hosted by Jimmy Ross (Sign-up for Open Mic begins at 7:30pm, limit 14 readers). Brendan Lorber was on the schedule but can not get out of New York due to the hurricane. Sign-up begins at 7:30, the feature at 8 pm. McTague organized the Battle Hill Poetry Marathon, the New Zinc Bar Reading Series, and served as both editor & consigliore for Lungfull! Magazine from 2001 to the present. Her forthcoming book, Super Natural, from Trembling Pillow Press, is due out in the winter of 2012

& Friday, Nov. 2 join Room 220 for an evening of discussion between media theorists Joy Fuqua and Michele White at 6 p.m. on Friday, Nov. 2 at the brand new Press Street Headquarters (3817 St. Claude Ave., at Pauline). Both authors have recently released books via Duke University Press that examine, respectively, the history of hospital televisions and television’s role in “hospitalizing” American households, and some social ramifications of eBay.

& Saturday, Nov. 3 at 2 pm. its the Poetry Buffet at the Milton Latter Memorial Libriary, hosted by Gina Ferarra and featuring Danny Kerwick, Melanie Leavitt and Jimmy Ross.

& Also on Nov. 3 Micheal Zell reads from and signs his novel Errata at Faubourgh Marigny Art & Books 3-5 p.m. (signing), 6-8 p.m. (reading & signing). Picture a neo-noir Nabokov using Stern-like disgressions directed by Joycean movements of the mind. This book, with its sultry darkness of city and soul, teaches the reader how to uniquely read it.

& Every Saturday it is Story Time with Miss Maureen at the Maple Leaf Bookshop, with a new children’s book, crafts and more.

& Sunday, Nov. 4 at Maple Street Bookshop’s Healing Center location, Ken Foster presents his book I’m A Good Dog at 1 pm. “A beautiful book about some of the most beautiful and big-hearted dogs in the world—dogs who’ve been misunderstood and discriminated against for far too long. Ken Foster and his rescue work are a gift to animals and people alike. Everyone should read I’m a Good Dog to learn the truth about pit bulls, and celebrate them.”
—Rebecca Skloot, author of the #1 New York Times bestseller The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks

& Sunday at 3 p.m. at the Maple Leaf Bar Reading Series is an Open Mic, preceded and followed by the usual poets-and-alcohol frivolity. Intererested readers should contact Nancy Harris about featuring at New Orleans’ longest-running poetry reading series, founded by Everette Maddox.

& Maple Leaf at the Healing Center hosts the release of I’m a Good Dog by Maple Street’s own Ken Foster, at 2 p.m. Perhaps more than any other breed, the pit bull has been dogged by negative stereotypes. Setting the record straight, Ken Foster sings the praises of pit bulls in his new book, a gorgeously illustrated, tenderly written tribute to this most misunderstood of canines.

& On Sunday evening at 7 p.m. Spoken Word New Orleans presents Speak Easy Sundays Poetry at the Club Caribbean 2441 Bayou Road. Cover. Visit their website for updates on other spoken words and visiting artists all around town.

& Susan Larson, the former book editor of the former Times-Picayune newspaper and member of the National Book Critics Circle hosts The Reading Life on WWNO (89.9 FM) on Tuesdays at 1:30 p.m. repeating Sundays at Noon. She features interviews with authors of local and national interest.

& On Tuesday, Nov. 6 the student-run 1718 Society hosts another installment of their reading series, featuring Carolyn Hembree reading from her most recently published poetry collection, Skinny (paperback, $14.00). Individual poems have appeared in Colorado Review, DIAGRAM, Gulf Coast, Indiana Review, jubilat, and Witness, among other journals and anthologies. Her poetry has received three Pushcart Prize nominations, a PEN Writers Grant, a Southern Arts Federation Grant, and a Louisiana Division of the Arts Fellowship Award in Literature.

& Also on Tuesday, Maple Leaf Bookstore hosts The First Tuesday Book Club at 5:45 pm at the Uptown location to discuss Gabrielle Hamilton’s Blood, Bones & Butter: The Inadvertent Education of a Reluctant Chef. Newcomers welcome.

& LadyFest hosts two days of literary readings from women writers this year: Wednesday, November 7th from 7-10 pm at 1501 St. Roch Ave, and Friday, November 9th from 8-11 pm at Buffa’s Lounge. This is a tremendous event that brings out a wide spectrum of local writers in all genres to read, so you want to book at least one of these dates in your calender. For a complete line up of art and music events visit ladyfestneworleans.org.

& Ed and Susan Poole present Louisiana Film History at Garden District Books Wednesday at 5:30 pm. This is the first such reference book listing ALL the films shot totally or partially in Louisiana since the inception of cinema, with descriptions and movie posters to match. The text deals with chronological periods, starting out with a general history of film in the U.S. and moving through various decades in Louisiana, the films made then and background information. It is filled with interesting facts and stories and well illustrated with posters of the major films of that decade. The last decade is 2000 to 2012 with a final chapter that details the boom in filming in the state, Hollywood on the Bayou and how that came about. An appendix lists all films alphabetically, and there is a full index to the book itself.

& Also, when you think turkey I think Faulkner Society’s Words & Music Festival at the turn of the next month. Watch this space and the society’s website for updates on this year’s event.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,682 other followers